Internet

Social media has increasingly become a line of communication between authorities and the public.

The Montana Highway Patrol launched the Tweeting Trooper program at the beginning of 2018 for many of its districts. In January, the program assigned its seventh Tweeting Trooper to the Billings region.

Martin Bekkelund / Flickr

Earlier this month, Billings Public Schools implemented a new filter system that blocks websites based on a list of keywords.

A few days later, CounterPunch magazine reported that students were also unable to access certain websites addressing pro-LGBTQ issues.

Twelfth-grader Clara Bentler, a student leader at Billings Senior High School, says a teacher showed her the list of blocked keywords and key phrases.

If the activists' predictions pan out, Wednesday might see one of the largest digital protests to date.

Dozens of websites and apps have joined ranks with consumer advocacy groups, through a "Day of Action," to publicly protest the plan by the Federal Communications Commission to roll back regulations it placed on Internet service providers in 2015.

After a long day, many of us try to set down our technology and unplug from the world around us. But, according to a new report by the Pew Research Center and Elon University's Imagining the Internet Center, over the next few years, that will become much more difficult to do.