Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women

Paula María Bertol, Ambassador, Permanent Representative of Argentina to the OAS
Juan Manuel Herrera/OAS

On Friday, an intergovernmental organization hosted a hearing in Boulder, Colorado on the ongoing crisis of missing and murdered Indigenous women in the U.S. That group faces some of the highest violence and sexual assault rates in the nation.

Photo courtesy of the Missoula Police Department

Yet another Indigenous woman has gone missing in the Mountain West.

Jermaine Charlo disappeared near a grocery store in Missoula, Montana last month. The 23-year-old is the 13th native woman to go missing in the state since January.

Loxie Loring helps lead a march to remember her daughter, Ashley Loring. She went missing from the Blackfeet Reservation over a year ago.
Nate Hegyi / Mountain West News Bureau

There’s a storm rolling in over the Blackfeet Indian Reservation in Montana. The clouds are low and dark as distant lightning cracks over a green prairie. 

Wade Running Crane is starting to get wet.

“This is like a sign from Ashley that she’s here,” he said.

Marita Growing Thunder sews ribbon skirts to remember missing and murdered indigenous women.
Nate Hegyi / Mountain West News Bureau

  

Marita Growing Thunder, 19, is sitting in the grass on a warm spring afternoon at the University of Montana campus in Missoula where she studies art. Growing up, she said, her mom was always talking about aunt Yvonne.