YPRnews

Jackie Yamanaka

Men and women gathered at Montana State University Billings Thursday to take part in a participatory art event where people pour red sand into the cracks of sidewalks. It’s a visual reminder not to let the victims of human trafficking fall through the cracks of society.

Bureau of Land Management / Bureau of Land Management

The U.S. Interior Department wants to repeal an Obama-era rule that reduces the burning of methane gas on federal lands. The public comment period on that plan ended April 23, 2018 and it looks like almost everybody thought it was a bad idea.


The Amerian Prairie Reserve manages nearly 400,000 acres of former ranchland in northeastern Montana. They're kicking out cattle and replacing them with wild bison.
Nate Hegyi / Mountain West News Bureau

  

This is about two very different visions of how we should use land in the American West.

On the Great Plains of Montana, conservationists and tribes want to rewind the clock and return wild bison to the shortgrass prairie. But cowboys and ranchers say if that happens, their way of life – their very culture – will disappear.

Jackie Yamanaka

Governor Steve Bullock is touring Montana to listen to providers about the health and economic impacts of the state’s Medicaid Expansion program, also known as the HELP Act. It’s set to expire at the end of next year unless the 2019 Montana Legislature acts.

A recent aerial survey revealed there are only three wild caribou left in the contiguous United States. Biologists say the chances to save them are slim, but an international recovery team is still trying.

Before the 19th century, thousands of woodland caribou ranged from Washington to New England. But then those herds were decimated by overhunting, logging and broken-up habitat.

Now you can count the number of wild caribou left in the Lower 48 on one hand. They live in the Selkirk Mountains of northern Idaho.

Jackie Yamanaka

There were general agreements on issue positions related to public lands and health care among the 6 candidates seeing the Democratic nomination for the U.S. House during their debate last night in Billings.  But some of the candidates also took the opportunity to stand out from the crowded field as Democratic voters have to decide which one to advance to take on the Republican incumbent. 

Jackie Yamanaka

Some Montana college students aren’t content to sit on the political sidelines.  Instead they are joining political party groups, registering voters and organizing and sponsoring debates.

Yellowstone
Nate Hegyi / Yellowstone Public Radio

Now that a National Parks entrance fee hike is on hold, competing legislation is floating through Congress that would permanently pay for the multi-billion dollar maintenance backlog using federal mineral revenues.

Briana Lamb posts a status update on Facebook at the state capitol in Helena, Montana.
Nate Hegyi / Yellowstone Public Radio

Mark Zuckerberg is on the hot seat this week. He’s testifying in front of Congress about Facebook user profiles being mined without permission.  

The data breach prompted a “Delete Facebook” movement that hasn’t really gained any traction.

That’s especially true in the Native American community, where Facebook is much more than sharing cat videos or keeping in touch with friends and family.  

Jackie Yamanaka

Former U.S. Energy Secretary Bill Richardson says the coal industry isn’t dead. He says it’s in transition and there needs to be a plan. Part of that plan may be forming a coalition with renewable energy producers.

Richardson envisions something akin to a Marshall Plan. It was a U.S. program that helped Europe rebuild after the devastation of World War II.

Pages