For Special Ed Students, Remote Learning Could Mean Foregoing Some Services

For Special Ed Students, Remote Learning Could Mean Foregoing Some Services As Montana schools begin to provide education remotely in order to reduce the spread of coronavirus, parents will be serving as their child’s co-teacher at home. For many, that’s a large undertaking, but it’s even more of a challenge for parents of students with special needs.

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Montana Coronavirus and COVID-19 News

Mar 27, 2020
The novel coronavirus.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention / Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Find the latest news about the novel coronavirus and COVID-19 in Montana here. This post will be updated daily, with newer information at the top.

You can also find more Montana-related coronavirus information from the state health department, as well as updates from the CDC and tips for preventing and dealing with COVID-19.

The marque at the Babcock Theater in billings reads "Wash Your Hands, We Will Be Back."
Nicky Ouellet / Yellowstone Public Radio

Montana Governor Steve Bullock’s stay at home directive goes into effect at midnight through April 10.

County attorneys are to enforce the directive that prohibits Montanans from leaving their homes, with exceptions for essential trips to access food, medical care, low-risk recreation and some exempted work.

Fire officers on the Crow Reservation say they responded to a dozen small wildfires over the past week.

It's Friday, March 27th. Today we have stories about elk poaching and updates on the coronavirus including stories about hospital finances and mental healthcare and addiction clinics.

As Montana schools begin to provide education remotely in order to reduce the spread of coronavirus, parents will be serving as their child’s co-teacher at home. For many, that’s a large undertaking, but it’s even more of a challenge for parents of students with special needs.

Montana Gov. Steve Bullock is ordering the state’s roughly 1 million residents to stay at home, with some exceptions like getting supplies or groceries, seeking medical care or going on a walk. It’s the state’s latest step to slow the spread of the novel coronavirus.

The order starts Saturday March 28 and lasts two weeks until April 10th.

As the COVID-19 pandemic tightens its grip, the services provided by Montana’s mental health and addiction clinics are getting even more complicated.

Those who survived the 2017 state budget cuts have hung on by their fingernails ever since. And it may get a lot more difficult.

A bull elk searches for food beneath the snow in Yellowstone National Park in February 2020.
Jacob W. Frank/YNP (Public Domain)

Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks wardens are seeking information on a poached elk found near Ennis last week. 

Wyoming Coronavirus and COVID-19 News

Mar 26, 2020
The Wyoming state capitol building
Ken Kanouse/Flickr (CC BY-ND 2.0)

Updated 3/27/20 3:40 P.M. 

Christian Bautista, a junior at MSUB, studying abroad in France.
Courtesy Christan Bautista

A Montana State University Billings student studying abroad in France when the coronavirus started to spread in Europe made it home last week after a chaotic journey. He took precautions as he traveled, like wearing a face mask, but now he's experiencing symptoms of the COVID-19 illness.

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