A woman types on a laptop on her lap next to a poster that reads "Crazy Mountains."
Rachel Cramer / Yellowstone Public Radio

Proposed Land Swap Aims To Reduce Conflict, Improve Access In Crazy Mountains

A group of unlikely bedfellows is trying to drum up support for a plan it says will reduce conflict in the Crazy Mountains and improve access to public land in southwest Montana. The plan includes land swaps and a new trail.

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The exterior doors and wall of Alpha House in Billings, Mont.
Nicky Ouellet / Yellowstone Public Radio

Billings Correctional Facility Adds Six COVID-19 Cases

courtesy Stephen Jimenez

Resounds: Stephen Jimenez

Montana Coronavirus And COVID-19 News

9 hours ago
The novel coronavirus.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention / Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

07/13/20, 5:45 p.m.

Montana confirmed 252 new COVID-19 cases from Saturday through Monday, marking one of its highest three-day totals. Montana’s rate of infections still trails most of the nation. But the number of cases has risen sharply over the last month as economic restrictions eased. According to a tally by Johns Hopkins University, Montana had 1,677 confirmed cases and 29 deaths due to the virus as of Saturday.

Environmental groups are suing the Bitterroot National Forest over a proposed project that calls for about 5,600 acres of commercial logging.  The Gold Butterfly project would take place on about 7,300 acres. It includes non-commercial thinning and about 4,800 acres of prescribed burns.

The exterior doors and wall of Alpha House in Billings, Mont.
Nicky Ouellet / Yellowstone Public Radio


Six more residents of a corrections facility in Billings have tested positive for COVID-19 amid a steep rise in cases in the county where it’s located.

A sign near Gardiner, Montana, sits near the north entrance to Yellowstone National Park, May 16, 2019.
Rachel Cramer / Yellowstone Public Radio

Yellowstone National Park said Monday it hosted over half a million visitors in June. That’s around one-third less than the same time in 2019.

Lightning, warm temperatures and dry conditions are keeping firefighters busy in the region. YPR’s Kay Erickson has the details.

A woman types on a laptop on her lap next to a poster that reads "Crazy Mountains."
Rachel Cramer / Yellowstone Public Radio


A group of unlikely bedfellows is trying to drum up support for a plan it says will reduce conflict in the Crazy Mountains and improve access to public land in southwest Montana. The plan includes land swaps and a new trail.

courtesy Stephen Jimenez

“Truth has become the casualty of our addiction to agendas and opinions and rapid-fire tweets.”  - Stephen Jimenez

Over the past two decades, Stephen Jimenez has spent extended periods of time in Wyoming researching, reporting, and writing about the Matthew Shepard tragedy. For his reporting on the case he won the Writers Guild of America Award and the Mongerson Award for Investigative Reporting from Northwestern University’s Medill School of Journalism. He is the author of The Book of Matt: The Real Story of the Murder of Matthew Shepard.


It's Monday, July 13th. The Northwest Montana State Fair and Rodeo, state guidance on how to reopen schools in the fall and the next installment of our series on the Little Shell Tribe.

Headshots of members of the 2019-2020 Montana State-Tribal Relations Committee
Montana Legislature


The Montana State-Tribal Relations Committee is seeking public comment on nine bill proposals related to runaway youth, motor carrier services, missing persons and federal recognition of the Little Shell Tribe.

A photo of Linda Watson shuffling through Little Shell Tribe enrollment applications.
Kevin Trevellyan / YPR

Roughly six months ago, the federal government officially recognized the Little Shell Tribe of Chippewa Indians as a sovereign nation. It was national news then. But what does it mean now for the members and descendants of Little Shell? Nine students from the University of Montana School of Journalism spent a semester reporting on the impact of recognition on what has long been considered Montana’s “landless tribe.” This story is part of the student-produced series, Project Little Shell.

It's February, about two months after the tribe received the federal recognition it had sought for more than 130 years. Linda Watson is shuffling papers at her desk at the Little Shell Tribe of Chippewa Indians' headquarters in Great Falls. She's received a lot of phone calls recently.

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