Kay Erickson

All Things Considered Host

Kay Erickson has been working in broadcasting in Billings for more than 20 years. She spent well over a decade as news assignment editor at KTVQ-TV before joining the staff at YPR. She is a graduate of Northern Illinois University, with a degree in broadcast journalism. Shortly after graduation she worked in Great Falls where she was one of the first female sports anchor and reporter in Montana.

Kay is also a writer for Yellowstone Valley Woman’s Magazine.

Ways to Connect

Opportunity Link

Arts and culture along the Montana Hi-Line are getting a big financial boost thanks to a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts. The $100,000  Our Town  grant was awarded two years ago to Opportunity Link  in Havre, to plan a Hi-Line Arts Trail and develop a mobile app that will draw attention and tourists to the area.

The Hi-Line Arts Trail project is just getting started. Rosie Goldich, Opportunity Link project coordinator , said they are seeking applications from the Hi-Line,  from Glacier to Phillips counties.

It is one of the most famous and beautiful highways in the country. But few know the history of the iconic Beartooth Highway.  Saturday, Nov. 19, at the Billings Public Library, people will get a chance of hear the details of this engineering marvel.

Jon Axline is Montana Department of Transportation historian and author of a book on the highway. He says its scenic qualities may not have been the goal of its construction. It was intended to divert mining trucks from going though Yellowstone National Park and coming out at the railroad station in Red Lodge. And he says Red Lodge even  had big plans to build a smelter.

Charles M. Bair Family Museum

It’s a chance to go “behind the scenes” and see how one of Montana’s most famous and wealthy families really lived.

This Saturday, Nov. 12 is the fifth annual Upstairs Downstairs at the Charles M. Bair Family Museum in Martinsdale. 

It’s a rare opportunity for visitors go upstairs to the private family living quarters off limits during regular tours.

Yellowstone Art Museum

There’s a new exhibit at the Yellowstone Art Museum in Billings that’s all about animals. Visitors can even see some of these live critters up close Saturday, Nov. 5.

It’s called Unleashed: Critters from the Permanent Collection. YAM Senior Curator Bob Durden said the art is from the museum’s very own large collection.

MSU Billings University Relations

Seldom seen drawings by a famous Crow chief will be  on display starting next week on the MSUB campus.

“The drawings themselves are very unique and have rarely shown, specifically the drawings by Medicine Crow that are held in the MSUB Library,” said Dr. Leanne Gilbertston,  director of the Northcutt-Steele Gallery and art professor.

The Medicine Crow drawings will be combined with contemporary art by present day Crow/Apsa'alooke artist  Wendy Red Star, for an unusual exhibit.

An exhibit of mixed media paintings and a paper sculpture that explores the relationship between written language and visuals images is on display at MSU-Billings through October 13, 2016.

Nishiki  Sugawara-Beda, associate professor of art at the University of Idaho, immigrated to the U.S. from Japan as a young adult.  Her exhibition - "Word Terminal" - is supported by the Idaho Commission on the Arts/National Endowment for the Arts.

Montana organizations joined an effort to ensure eligible adults are registered to vote in this year’s election as part of National Voter Registration Day, Sept. 27.

Kiah Abbey, deputy director for the Forward Montana Foundation, had been working with the League of Women Voters, student governments, businesses and nonprofits across the state to set up places where people can register to vote.

Riverbend Publishing

It’s a fascinating story about a really flawed person whose legacy is a shipwreck in Yellowstone National Park.

Mike Stark, former Billings Gazette reporter, wrote Wrecked in Yellowstone: Greed, Obsession, and the Untold Story of Yellowstone’s Most Infamous Shipwreck.  It’s a book about the early history of Yellowstone National Park and entrepreneur E-C Waters.

Stark called Waters a "deeply flawed" and ambitious man. 

The public is invited to ask questions and direct comments to Yellowstone County’s top law enforcement officials Monday night, Aug. 1, in Billings.

Sheriff Mike Linder will join Police Chief Rich St. John at the latest “Chat with the Chief.”

St. John said it is an open forum.

Grown in Montana products will be showcased for the first time at the Montana State Fair in Great Falls.

Cody Shick with Montana’s Agriculture Department put together the store.  It’s an effort by the agency to promote value added agriculture.

“They really wanted to take some of these smaller companies that use Montana crops and process in Montana and really help market and promote," said Shick. 

Nineteen companies will offer 1 to 5 of their products for sale.

Pages