Olivia Reingold

Tribal Affairs Correspondent

Olivia Reingold is the Tribal Affairs Correspondent for Yellowstone Public Radio. She was previously a producer for Georgia Public Broadcasting and participated in the NPR program, “Next Generation Radio.” She graduated from Columbia Journalism School, where she reported on opioids and the 12-step recovery program, Narcotics Anonymous. She’s from Washington D.C. and is particularly interested in covering addiction. She likes to sew, just don’t ask her to follow a pattern.

Ways to Connect

A woman in a red t-shirt stands holding a poster in front of a crowd seated at desks in a college classroom setting.
Olivia Reingold / Yellowstone Public Radio

 

The Montana Missing Idigenous Persons Task Force hosted a public meeting in Billings Feb. 6. Some community members pressed for Native people to form a task force of their own.

C-SPAN / C-SPAN.ORG


A new federal task force formed to address high rates of missing and murdered indigenous people met in Washington, D.C. for the first time Jan. 29.

A recent Montana case highlights its limitations.

People gather around candles and a picture of Selena Not Afraid at a nighttime vigil.
Olivia Reingold / Yellowstone Public Radio

The sheriff leading an investigation into a 16-year-old Crow girl’s disappearance and death has requested assistance from the state Division of Criminal Investigation.

A woman holds up a smart phone that is recording a man standing at a podium in front of her.
Sofia Stuart-Rasi / Montana Public Radio


This weekend, the Little Shell Tribe of Chippewa Indians celebrated something generations have fought for and that 400 other U.S. tribes are without: federal recognition.

The tribal seal for the Little Shell Tribe of Chippewa Indians.
Little Shell Tribe / Montana Little Shell Tribe of Chippewa Indians


The Little Shell Tribe of Chippewa Indians on Saturday will celebrate something generations have fought for and that 400 other North American tribes are without: federal recognition.

People gather around candles and a picture of Selena Not Afraid at a nighttime vigil.
Olivia Reingold / Yellowstone Public Radio

Update Jan. 23, 2020:  A preliminary autopsy report released Thursday says Selena Not Afraid died of hypothermia. Montana's chief medical examiner at the state crime lab in Billings also found there were no wounds, broken bones or other signs of violence on her body. A toxicology report has not yet been completed and could take several weeks. The following story was published before the autopsy report was released.

Law enforcement and family members are clashing over what they say killed a 16-year-old Crow girl, who was found dead near an Interstate-90 rest stop earlier this week.

Francine Amyotte waits for volunteer searchers to come in at a makeshift command center based in the old Crow casino Apsaalooke Nights on Jan. 17, 2020.
Olivia Reingold / Yellowstone Public Radio

The body of a 16-year-old Crow girl missing since New Years Day has been found near where she disappeared at an Interstate-90 rest area outside of Billings.

Posters with handwritten names and the message "Hope for Sal" blow in the wind at the rest stop where Selena Not Afraid was last seen.
Olivia Reingold / Yellowstone Public Radio


Multiple agencies are continuing to search for a missing girl from south-central Montana through frigid weather.

Montana Secretary of State Corey Stapleton
Corey Stapleton

 

Montana’s Secretary of State is facing heat online for writing a newsletter that compares the Israeli-Palestinian conflict to U.S.-tribal relations.

A child and mother exiting a nursing home with a bright blue sign that reads, "Awe Kualawaache"
Olivia Reingold / Yellowstone Public Radio

The Crow Nation has reissued its monthly elder checks after banks declined to cash the first ones. The tribe says a clerical error caused the mishap that inconvenienced elders right before the holidays.

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