Olivia Reingold

Tribal Issues Correspondent

Olivia Reingold is the Tribal Issues Correspondent for Yellowstone Public Radio. She was previously a producer for Georgia Public Broadcasting and participated in the NPR program, “Next Generation Radio.” She graduated from Columbia Journalism School, where she reported on opioids and the 12-step recovery program, Narcotics Anonymous. She’s from Washington D.C. and is particularly interested in covering addiction. She likes to sew, just don’t ask her to follow a pattern.

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Apsaalooke Nights Casino
Olivia Reingold / Yellowstone Public Radio

 

The Crow Legislature is considering a bill that would introduce alcohol on the Tribe’s Reservation. It’s part of a plan to revitalize the Crow economy with casino dollars.

Sheild of the Little Shell Chippewa Tribal
Little Shell Tribe / http://www.montanalittleshelltribe.org/


Republican Congressman Greg Gianforte is urging his peers to grant the Little Shell Tribe in Montana federal recognition.

Left: Misty LaPlant, Right: Tina Chamberlain
Montana Department of Justice

Montana Attorney General Tim Fox announced Monday he’s hired two specialists to help address the issue of missing and murdered indigenous women.

Solar Farm
Michael Mees / Flickr CC BY 2.0

The Northern Cheyenne Nation received a $2 million dollar federal grant this summer to build a new solar farm. It’s part of the Tribe’s decision to invest in renewable energy over mining their rich coal deposits.

Northern Cheyenne Tribal School Logo
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On the Northern Cheyenne Reservation, Busby has water again after losing it Tuesday afternoon.

People stand in a group waiting for the conference to begin.
Olivia Reingold / Yellowstone Public Radio

 

The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes were exploring the link between human trafficking and missing and murdered indigenous people at a conference last week.

YPR News’ Olivia Reingold was there. She shared her reporting with Nicky Ouellet.

Nicky Ouellet: This is the third and last day of the conference on Missing and Murdered Indigenous People, hosted at Salish Kootenai College on the Flathead Reservation. What have you learned about the scope of this issue?

Fire fighers use drip torches to contain a grass fire ignited by a burning coal seam on the Northern Cheyenne Reservation over Labor Day weekend.
Jon Kohn / Bureau of Indian Affairs

Fire crews on the Northern Cheyenne Reservation have counted 80-plus coal seam fires. This season, some are new and have caused grass fires, while others date back decades.

This week we chat with the Billings Gazettes' Tom Lutey about what's in place to help the people and town of Colstrip transition past the partial closure of the power plant. We taste treats at Brockel's Chocolates and spend the day with Miss Crow Nation as she steps down from her throne.

Sticky notes list risk factors for sex trafficking
Olivia Reingold / Yellowstone Public Radio


On Tuesday the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes kicked off a missing and murdered indigenous peoples conference to raise awareness about the work being done to understand the scope of the issue both on the reservation and in the state. Yellowstone Public Radio News’ Olivia Reingold is covering the conference and shared her reporting with Nicky Ouellet.

A train ships pieces of pipeline materials.
Nate Hegyi / Mountain West News Bureau


Nebraska’s highest court approved the Keystone XL pipeline’s route through the state Friday. That makes Montana the focus of efforts to halt the project’s construction.

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