Rachel Cramer

Bozeman Reporter

Rachel Cramer is YPR’s Bozeman-based reporter. While her roots are in the rolling hills of southwest Iowa, Rachel fell hard for Montana during family vacations. She started working for Montana Public Radio as a website assistant while finishing a master’s degree at the University of Montana, and joined the news team in 2017. As an evening newscaster and reporter, she covered issues ranging from wolf-rancher conflict solutions to tech start-ups. Later that year, she was selected for a fellowship with Crossing the Divide, a cross-country reporting project developed by the GroundTruth Project and WGBH. Rachel and four other early-career journalists covered divisions in five communities across the US, partnered with local news outlets and visited high schools. Before joining YPR, Rachel worked for Threshold, an award-winning public radio and podcast based in Montana.

A grizzly bear walks through the trees near Swan Lake in Yellowstone National Park on June 06, 2015.
Public Domain

A hiker received minor injuries from a grizzly bear Monday in Yellowstone National Park.

Bison move through the Lamar Valley in Yellowstone National Park on October 14, 2015.
Public Domain

Eleven bull bison quarantined in a federal facility near Yellowstone National Park were transferred to the Fort Peck Indian Reservation on June 24. There, they’ll complete the final phase of a program to make sure they are disease free before being sent out to start or boost herds across the U.S.

The town of Gardiner, Montana spreads out along the Yellowstone River and the North Entrance to Yellowstone National Park, May 31, 2019.
Rachel Cramer/Yellowstone Public Radio

 

The Custer Gallatin National Forest is proposing to make temporary shooting bans in two small areas north of Yellowstone National Park permanent.

Montana's Family Farms And Ranches Face Uncertain Future As Producers Age Out

Jun 18, 2020
68-year-old Hugh Spencer checks on one of his three chicken barns near Plains, Montana takne on June 11, 2020.
Nolan Lister / Helena Independent Record


The 68 year old poultry farmer pointed out the hen houses he built decades ago, providing details of each wooden tenement residents.

Hugh Spencer built the hen houses and accompanying grain bins, which look like high density housing for chickens, shortly after he and his wife, Viki, purchased the land in 1981.

A sign reads "We welcome all races, all religions, all countries of origin, all sexual orientations, all genders. We stand with you. You are safe here."
Rachel Cramer / Yellowstone Public Radio


Organizers in Bozeman are calling for more support for Black students at Montana’s largest university and for businesses to commit to anti-racist policies. One organization is gearing up to offer workshops on understanding race.

A photo of Sweet Peaks Ice Cream shop taken on June 10, 2020
Rachel Cramer / Yellowstone Public Radio

Many economists say the federal Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) has helped prevent broad economic collapse in the U.S. But they say transparency will be key in understanding how well the program actually worked. Yellowstone Public Radio News’s Nicky Ouellet spoke with Rachel Cramer who’s been reporting on the PPP in Montana and new rules to make it easier for borrowers to qualify for loan forgiveness.

Over the past week thousands of people across Montana turned out for locally-organized rallies in support of black Americans and against police brutality. The rallies drew disparate crowds, and while talk got heated at times, the events remained non-violent.

Women lie face down in the street. One, with a red handprint painted on her face in honor of missing and murdered indigenous women, looks at the camera.
Nicky Ouellet / Yellowstone Public Radio

Over the past week thousands of people across Montana turned out for locally-organized rallies in support of black Americans and against police brutality. The rallies drew disparate crowds, and while talk got heated at times, the events remained non-violent.

The entrance sign for West Yellowstone.
Spend A Day Touring LLC / Flickr (CC BY SA2)

Health officials say the results from wastewater sampling in West Yellowstone align with five new COVID-19 cases.

A photo of COVID-19 testing in the Crow Agency taken on May 27, 2020
Nicky Ouellet / Yellowstone Public Radio

Montana’s COVID-19 case count continues to rise as travel restrictions and business closures are lifted and testing becomes more widely available. The state health department added 14 new lab confirmed cases on June 4.

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