Rachel Cramer

Bozeman Reporter

Rachel Cramer is YPR’s Bozeman-based reporter. While her roots are in the rolling hills of southwest Iowa, Rachel fell hard for Montana during family vacations. She started working for Montana Public Radio as a website assistant while finishing a master’s degree at the University of Montana, and joined the news team in 2017. As an evening newscaster and reporter, she covered issues ranging from wolf-rancher conflict solutions to tech start-ups. Later that year, she was selected for a fellowship with Crossing the Divide, a cross-country reporting project developed by the GroundTruth Project and WGBH. Rachel and four other early-career journalists covered divisions in five communities across the US, partnered with local news outlets and visited high schools. Before joining YPR, Rachel worked for Threshold, an award-winning public radio and podcast based in Montana.

Barley being harvested.
Travis Wiens / Flickr (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

 

As more extreme droughts and floods and other climate effects threaten food production and the survival of rural communities, there’s a debate about whether sustainable agriculture can be achieved through new federal policies or shifting markets. 

A man walking along the shore of a river with fishing gear on.
Tom Roche / Flickr (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

The Montana Department of Environmental Quality announced Thursday that the Lower Gallatin Watershed is its next priority basin. This means hundreds of thousands of dollars will become available to address pollution in over half of the watershed’s major streams and rivers.

The Junction Butte Wolf Pack standing in the snow.
Yellowstone National Park / Yellowstone National Park

Two wolf pups from a famous wolf pack in Yellowstone were killed by a car in the park November 19. 

A group of people holding signs calling for impeachment stand along a street sidewalk.
Aaron Bolton / Montana Public Radio

Ahead of Wednesday's U.S. House vote on articles of impeachment, several hundred Montanans rallied across the state Tuesday night both to defend the president and to call for his removal from office.

A red building of housing units.
Montana Department of Commerce

The Montana Department of Commerce announced this week that for the first time, state dollars are available to develop affordable rental homes for low- to moderate-income residents.

A lavander field.
osde8info / Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0)

 

Federal crop insurance is a safety net for many farmers and rural communities but it typically favors the big commodities like corn, soybeans, wheat and cotton. A few years ago, a new type of insurance emerged to cover everything grown or raised on a farm under one umbrella, even specialty crops like hemp and lavender that don’t have their own policies. It’s been slow to catch on but a few modifications may entice more farmers to get on board in 2020. 

Tourists visit the general store at Tower Fall, Yellowstone National Park, June 2018.
YNP/Public Domain

Yellowstone National Park officials are reviewing thousands of public comments on a proposal to improve Wi-Fi access in developed areas. Some people who work in the park say it’s important for visitors and employee retention. Others worry it will only distract people from nature and lead to more commercialization in national parks. 

Renee Grayson / Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

The Trump administration reauthorized a controversial device used to kill livestock predators Thursday, despite strong opposition. 

Bison graze in Lamar Valley in Yellowstone National Park, August 18, 2016.
NPS/Neal Herbert (Public Domain)

State, federal and tribal representatives tasked with managing bison in and around Yellowstone National Park voted again Tuesday to reduce the herd size as animals migrate out of the park this winter. 

This image shows 3 bison in the snow at Yellowstone National Park.
Public Domain / Jacob W. Frank/NPS

A federal court in Montana denied a temporary halt on the winter bison hunt near Yellowstone National Park on Monday. 

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