Rachel Cramer

Bozeman Reporter

Rachel Cramer is YPR’s Bozeman-based reporter. While her roots are in the rolling hills of southwest Iowa, Rachel fell hard for Montana during family vacations. She started working for Montana Public Radio as a website assistant while finishing a master’s degree at the University of Montana, and joined the news team in 2017. As an evening newscaster and reporter, she covered issues ranging from wolf-rancher conflict solutions to tech start-ups. Later that year, she was selected for a fellowship with Crossing the Divide, a cross-country reporting project developed by the GroundTruth Project and WGBH. Rachel and four other early-career journalists covered divisions in five communities across the US, partnered with local news outlets and visited high schools. Before joining YPR, Rachel worked for Threshold, an award-winning public radio and podcast based in Montana.

Tourists visit the general store at Tower Fall, Yellowstone National Park, June 2018.
YNP/Public Domain

Two private companies that operate the general stores, lodges and campgrounds in Yellowstone National Park received the green light to build more seasonal employee housing.

Public Domain / Jacob W. Frank/NPS

A group of Gardiner residents are pushing for new restrictions to the annual bison hunt near Yellowstone National Park’s north entrance. But at a recent interagency meeting, tribal representatives say some of these changes would violate their treaty rights.

Chickpeas growing
Washington State Department of Agriculture / Flickr (CC BY-NC 2.0)

A Great Falls company that processes lentils, chickpeas and dry peas recently filed for bankruptcy, partly due to high tariffs instituted by the Trump Administration.

Pulse crop prices are half of what they were a few years ago and tradewars have cut off many of the main markets, leaving farmers and processors with few options.

Yellowstone National Park's north entrance by Gardiner, Montana, May 16, 2019.
Rachel Cramer / Yellowstone Public Radio

Law enforcement is still investigating a human-caused fire that temporarily closed the north entrance of Yellowstone National Park Friday. Rachel Cramer with Yellowstone Public Radio News reports.

The Northwesterner's captain, Tom Short, controls the lifter to bring the gillnet into the boat. The Northwesterner is one of six boats used to catch non-native lake trout in Yellowstone Lake in Yellowstone National Park, July 25, 2019.
Rachel Cramer / Yellowstone Public Radio

Yellowstone National Park has been working for over a decade to protect one of the last genetically pure Yellowstone cutthroat trout populations in the Intermountain West. Its survival is the linchpin in a complex food web that includes animals as small as zooplankton and as large as grizzly bears. The Park is optimistic in its fight against the species’ biggest threat — non-native lake trout. 

Amy Kelley Hoitsma (left) and Suzanne Held (right) visit Tin Works warehouse in Bozeman where the PhotoVoicesNE project will be displayed, July 17, 2019.
Rachel Cramer / Yellowstone Public Radio

As Bozeman undergoes rapid growth and development, a neighborhood north of downtown is trying to preserve its history and quirkiness.

Site of the Seven Mile Hole Fire near the Yellowstone River in Yellowstone National Park, July 18, 2019.
Courtesy of Yellowstone National Park

A lightning-caused wildfire is burning one-tenth of an acre in Yellowstone National Park near Canyon Village. It’s the Park’s first wildfire of the year.

Screenshot of development projects in Bozeman from the city's Community Developer Viewer, July 18, 2019.
Rachel Cramer / Yellowstone Public Radio

A non-profit organization that serves more than 12,000 people in southwest Montana is updating its community needs assessment. It helps determine which projects get the green light and affects how millions of dollars are allocated. Communities across Park, Gallatin and Meagher Counties identified affordable housing as one of the top priorities in the last assessment three years ago.

Chris Fraser's installation in progress for Tinworks Art in Bozeman, July 2019.
Courtesy of Chris Fraser

With an old warehouse slated to be torn down in Bozeman’s historic northeastern neighborhood, a temporary, pop-up art installation aims to celebrate the space and test whether Bozeman would support a permanent art museum.

two wolves standing together
Jeremy Weber / Flickr (CC BY 2.0)


Hunters and anglers in Montana can now fund wolf mitigation and control efforts. The optional donation on licenses comes from a bill signed into law this legislative session.

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