Rachel Cramer

Bozeman Reporter

Rachel Cramer is YPR’s Bozeman-based reporter. While her roots are in the rolling hills of southwest Iowa, Rachel fell hard for Montana during family vacations. She started working for Montana Public Radio as a website assistant while finishing a master’s degree at the University of Montana, and joined the news team in 2017. As an evening newscaster and reporter, she covered issues ranging from wolf-rancher conflict solutions to tech start-ups. Later that year, she was selected for a fellowship with Crossing the Divide, a cross-country reporting project developed by the GroundTruth Project and WGBH. Rachel and four other early-career journalists covered divisions in five communities across the US, partnered with local news outlets and visited high schools. Before joining YPR, Rachel worked for Threshold, an award-winning public radio and podcast based in Montana.

Vice President Mike Pence speaks about infrastructure as Old Faithful erupts, Yellowstone National Park, June 13, 2019.
Rachel Cramer / Yellowstone Public Radio

Vice President Mike Pence visited Yellowstone National Park Thursday to discuss the Park Service’s backlog of maintenance projects. Pence says the Trump administration is committed to conservation and improving national parks infrastructure.

The mosquito serves as a vector for the West Nile Virus.
Wayne W G/FLICKR (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

The Wyoming Department of Health Tuesday reported its first case of West Nile Virus this year involving an adult in the northeastern part of the state. State and local public health officials are reminding Montanans to take steps to avoid mosquito bites and prevent infection

Malmstrom Air Force Base main gate, 2008.
Public Domain

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services is no longer considering using Malmstrom Air Force Base in Great Falls to house unaccompanied migrant children from the southern border.

Della Bighair-Stump, Traci Rabbit and Carrie Moran McCleary are three of the nine artists at the inaugural Tribal Marketplace at Yellowstone National Park, June 11-14, 2019.
Rachel Cramer / Yellowstone Public Radio

Yellowstone National Park launches its inaugural Tribal Marketplace and fashion show this week to highlight Native American artists and Plains Tribes culture. Three of the artists share how they blend traditional and modern design elements.

Eighth graders from Belgrade Middle School walk across the stage in the high school gym during their graduation ceremony in Belgrade, Montana, June 05, 2019.
Rachel Cramer / Yellowstone Public Radio

A threatening video posted to social media forced a shelter-in-place order for Belgrade schools and postponed a middle school graduation Tuesday. 

Tiny houses on display during Build Small Live Large 2017 in Portland, Oregon.
DanDavidCook/FLICKR (CC By-SA 4.0)

An organization in Bozeman recently received half-a-million dollars to jumpstart Montana’s first tiny home village for people facing chronic homelessness.

Close-up of a Samick classical guitar.
Spengy / Flickr (CC-by-2.0)

The Crown Guitar Workshop and Festival scheduled for the first time in Bozeman this summer has been cancelled, according to The Daily Interlake.

The Lionhead Recommended Wilderness near West Yellowstone, Montana, is part of the Custer Gallatin National Forest, May 31, 2019.
Rachel Cramer / Yellowstone Public Radio

The future of a forest stretching from West Yellowstone to South Dakota is reaching a pivotal point this week. The public comment period for the Custer Gallatin National Forest draft plan closes June 6, and the perspectives on forest management seem to be almost as diverse as the forest itself. One of the main areas of debate is recommended wilderness.

Big Brothers Big Sisters of Gallatin County is based in Bozeman, Montana, May 30, 2019.
Rachel Cramer / Yellowstone Public Radio

The same week Big Brothers Big Sisters of Missoula announced it would close its doors Friday, the same organizations in Gallatin and Park and Sweet Grass Counties announced they had received a quarter-million-dollar grant to address youth suicide.

Aerial view of Bozeman, 2008.
Jonesey/Flickr (CC-by-2.0)

The number of 911 calls in Bozeman was higher last year than the year before. Many of the calls were related to mental health issuesassaults, domestic disturbances, suicides. Now a first of its kind program two years in the making will pair law enforcement with therapists to prevent mental health emergencies.

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