Rachel Cramer

Bozeman Reporter

Rachel Cramer is YPR’s Bozeman-based reporter. While her roots are in the rolling hills of southwest Iowa, Rachel fell hard for Montana during family vacations. She started working for Montana Public Radio as a website assistant while finishing a master’s degree at the University of Montana, and joined the news team in 2017. As an evening newscaster and reporter, she covered issues ranging from wolf-rancher conflict solutions to tech start-ups. Later that year, she was selected for a fellowship with Crossing the Divide, a cross-country reporting project developed by the GroundTruth Project and WGBH. Rachel and four other early-career journalists covered divisions in five communities across the US, partnered with local news outlets and visited high schools. Before joining YPR, Rachel worked for Threshold, an award-winning public radio and podcast based in Montana.

Travis Swanson
Courtesy of Gallatin County Sheriff's Office

A member of the Gallatin County Sheriff's Office search and rescue team died Sunday during a rock climbing accident.

Representatives from Big Sky School District, Habitat for Humanity and the community dig into the future site of affordable housing for Big Sky teachers, July 12, 2019.
Rachel Cramer / Yellowstone Public Radio

Public schools in Big Sky are losing teachers because their salaries can’t keep up with the median sale price for a single-family house, which currently sits at $1 million. A new partnership to bring affordable, on-site housing to the school district is trying to change that.

The sun sets behind Montana State University's sculpture of Spirit, the school's mascot, April 2019.
Rachel Cramer / Yellowstone Public Radio


No arrest has been made and no charges filed against the Montana State University employee who was the focus of a campus “shelter-in-place” order Thursday in Bozeman.

The sun sets behind Montana State University's sculpture of Spirit, the school's mascot, April 2019.
Rachel Cramer / Yellowstone Public Radio

Update from the Associated Press at 12:30 P.M. July 12, 2019:

Montana State University officials say an employee will undergo a mental health evaluation after making threatening statements that caused a campus-wide lockdown.

Ecologists, fire managers and journalists visit a burn site one year after lightning started the Bacon Rind Fire, July 10, 2019.
Rachel Cramer / Yellowstone Public Radio

It’s been about a year since lightning started a fire that burned almost 4,500 acres in the Lee Metcalf Wilderness and Yellowstone National Park. Local fire managers and ecologists invited journalists to see how the burn site is recovering and learn how fire plays a role on the landscape.

The 2018 Infrastructure Report Card says Montana will need $1.15 billion to address immediate water needs over the next 20 years.
Joe Shlabotnik/FLICKR (CC-by-2.0)

Fourteen Montana communities will receive a total of $6.5 million of federal funds this year for local infrastructure, housing development and job creation projects. That’s almost a million dollars over last year.

A map of the new campus plans
Billings Clinic


Billings Clinic announced Wednesday it hired Bozeman-based Martel Construction to build phase one of its new medical campus in Bozeman.

Bozeman Police Sgt. Travis Munter brought his personal drone to the public event at the Bozeman Public Library July 2, 2019.
Rachel Cramer / Yellowstone Public Radio

A private donor is offering to help the Bozeman Police and Fire Departments buy a drone to use for investigations, search and rescue, and crisis situations. The departments would not need approval from city commissioners but say they are interested in public feedback.

A BLM UAS flying a mission as part of the 2018 BLM Advanced UAS Workshop held in Bozeman, Montana, June 15, 2018.
BLM/FLICKR (CC BY 2.0)

Bozeman’s Police and Fire Chiefs will discuss how drones could be used to make Montana’s fastest growing city safer at a public meeting Tuesday night. Some state agencies and cities in Montana are already using the technology.

A coyote hunts for small mammals in the tall grass, October 2008.
Vince O'Sullivan/FLICKR (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

About a dozen states – including Montana and Wyoming – are allowed to use a controversial device called the M-44. Advocates say it’s an important tool to protect sheep from coyotes. Critics call it a ‘cyanide bomb’ and say it’s too risky for humans and pets. Now, several environmental groups are pushing to ban them at the state and federal level.

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