Rachel Cramer

Bozeman Reporter

Rachel Cramer is YPR’s Bozeman-based reporter. While her roots are in the rolling hills of southwest Iowa, Rachel fell hard for Montana during family vacations. She started working for Montana Public Radio as a website assistant while finishing a master’s degree at the University of Montana, and joined the news team in 2017. As an evening newscaster and reporter, she covered issues ranging from wolf-rancher conflict solutions to tech start-ups. Later that year, she was selected for a fellowship with Crossing the Divide, a cross-country reporting project developed by the GroundTruth Project and WGBH. Rachel and four other early-career journalists covered divisions in five communities across the US, partnered with local news outlets and visited high schools. Before joining YPR, Rachel worked for Threshold, an award-winning public radio and podcast based in Montana.

A cow looks up on a farm near Bridger, Montana.
Kayla Desroches / Yellowstone Public Radio

A new federal bill co-sponsored by Montana’s Democratic Senator Jon Tester proposes temporarily stopping large food and agribusiness corporations from consolidating. It aims to increase competition in the market to support better prices for farmers and ranchers.

A bowl of hummus is surround by pieces of pita bread.
Public Domain

Americans’ growing love of hummus and other plant-based proteins has helped make Montana the number one producer of chickpeas and lentils in the country. But Big Sky farmers are watching politics in India and international trade disputes play out before going all in on a pulse crop powered love affair.

Mammoth Hot Springs in Yellowstone National Park releases steam into the bright blue sky, May 2019.
Rachel Cramer / Yellowstone Public Radio

Yellowstone National Park is famous for its explosive geysers, bubbling mud pots and psychedelic hot springs. Some visitors don’t realize it’s all part of a very large, active volcanic system. Others worry it’s going to erupt at any moment. Michael Poland, the Scientist-in-Charge of the Yellowstone Volcano Observatory, busts some myths and shares what’s really happening below the surface.

Tourists visit the general store at Tower Fall, Yellowstone National Park, June 2018.
YNP/Public Domain

The National Park Service wants to expand housing for seasonal employees who work for private companies operating in Yellowstone. Wednesday kicked off a 30-day public comment period.

Richard Parks' shows one of the fishing flies in Park's Fly Shop in Gardiner, MT, May 16, 2019.
Rachel Cramer / Yellowstone Public Radio

Tourism is the economic lifeblood for many gateway communities around Yellowstone National Park. In Gardiner, Montana, a second-generation fly shop is gearing up for its busiest season.

Resort residencies in Big Sky, Montana, 2006.
Jim (CC-By-SA-2.0)

A new economic profile report about Big Sky highlights one of the fastest population growth trends in the state and some of the struggles that come with it. Big Sky’s population has grown 21 percent over the last five years to almost 3,000 residents, according to a new economic profile from Bridge Economic Development released this week.

Left to right: Lill Erickson, Roger and Betsy Indreland and Chris Mehus on the Indreland Ranch north of Big Timber, MT, May 09, 2019.
Rachel Cramer / Yellowstone Public Radio

The Earth passed a new threshold this week — an observatory in Hawaii clocked the highest levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide in human history. A number of studies say CO2 is part of what’s driving higher temperatures, drought and longer fire seasons in the West. Now ranchers in Montana are testing out a new program that’s trying to put some of that carbon back in the ground.

The Republican National Committee sent a look-alike census-survey to residents in Montana, May 2019.
Courtesy of the Montana Department of Commerce

The Republican National Committee is sending out policy surveys with the option of enclosing $15 for processing a "Census Document." The Montana Department of Commerce is reminding Montana residents the actual U.S. Census will begin in March 2020 and will not ask for any money.

VDL's Director Greg Juda and Montana's State Veterinarian Marty Zaluski pose in the serology lab room in Bozeman, May 08, 2019.
Rachel Cramer / Yellowstone Public Radio

Montana’s only veterinary diagnostic laboratory plays a big role identifying diseases in livestock and pets. But their current facility in Bozeman is aging and has limited space. With a recently-hired, full-time director, the lab hopes to construct a new building to better serve the needs of animal owners and veterinarians across the state.

The sun sets behind Montana State University's sculpture of Spirit, the school's mascot, April 2019.
Rachel Cramer / Yellowstone Public Radio

Gov. Steve Bullock vetoed a bill Wednesday intended to protect free and peaceful demonstrations in all public outdoor places on college campuses.

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