Rachel Cramer

Bozeman Reporter

Rachel Cramer is YPR’s Bozeman-based reporter. While her roots are in the rolling hills of southwest Iowa, Rachel fell hard for Montana during family vacations. She started working for Montana Public Radio as a website assistant while finishing a master’s degree at the University of Montana, and joined the news team in 2017. As an evening newscaster and reporter, she covered issues ranging from wolf-rancher conflict solutions to tech start-ups. Later that year, she was selected for a fellowship with Crossing the Divide, a cross-country reporting project developed by the GroundTruth Project and WGBH. Rachel and four other early-career journalists covered divisions in five communities across the US, partnered with local news outlets and visited high schools. Before joining YPR, Rachel worked for Threshold, an award-winning public radio and podcast based in Montana.

Bozeman Police Sgt. Travis Munter brought his personal drone to the public event at the Bozeman Public Library July 2, 2019.
Rachel Cramer / Yellowstone Public Radio

A private donor is offering to help the Bozeman Police and Fire Departments buy a drone to use for investigations, search and rescue, and crisis situations. The departments would not need approval from city commissioners but say they are interested in public feedback.

A BLM UAS flying a mission as part of the 2018 BLM Advanced UAS Workshop held in Bozeman, Montana, June 15, 2018.
BLM/FLICKR (CC BY 2.0)

Bozeman’s Police and Fire Chiefs will discuss how drones could be used to make Montana’s fastest growing city safer at a public meeting Tuesday night. Some state agencies and cities in Montana are already using the technology.

A coyote hunts for small mammals in the tall grass, October 2008.
Vince O'Sullivan/FLICKR (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

About a dozen states – including Montana and Wyoming – are allowed to use a controversial device called the M-44. Advocates say it’s an important tool to protect sheep from coyotes. Critics call it a ‘cyanide bomb’ and say it’s too risky for humans and pets. Now, several environmental groups are pushing to ban them at the state and federal level.

A PowerPoint slide shows how responders in the 2019 News Media Preferences and Issues survey ranked the issues they care about the most.
Courtesy of the Greater Montana Foundation and the UM Bureau of Business and Economic Research.

A new survey released Thursday shows Montanans value and trust local news sources, and the most important issues for rural and urban residents are pretty similar, including jobs and the state’s economy.

The Gallatin County Law and Justice Center in Bozeman, June 26, 2019.
Rachel Cramer / Yellowstone Public Radio

Several weeks after a threatening Snapchat video caused a shelter-in-place order at Belgrade schools, one of the people connected to the case Tuesday pleaded not guilty to felony charges. 

The ophthalmoscope (left) and stethoscope (right) are some of the tools a physican uses when checking a patient's health.
Adrian Clark/FLICKR (CC BY-NA 2.0)

Bozeman’s city commissioners Monday unanimously approved the next step for a new ambulatory center in Montana’s fastest growing city. It’s an expansion of Billings Clinic, the largest health organization in the state.

Professor Michelle Flenniken points to emerging adult bees in her lab at Montana State University, June 19, 2019.
Rachel Cramer / Yellowstone Public Radio

Honey bees play a vital role pollinating many of the nuts, fruits and vegetables we eat, and they’re an important part of Montana’s economy. But the number of bees dying each year is higher than it was two decades ago. A team of researchers are looking for solutions, ranging from new genetic clues to wildflowers.

A raw steak, January 2012.
Taryn/FLICKR (CC BY-SA 2.0)

A new trade agreement announced Friday could mean more Montana beef makes its way to European consumers. 

Republican Congressman Greg Gianforte officially announces his run for Montana's governor, June 14, 2019.
rowebotz (CC-by-SA-4.0)

Montana’s Republican Congressman Greg Gianforte Friday officially announced his run in the state’s 2020 election for governor.

Vice President Mike Pence speaks about infrastructure as Old Faithful erupts, Yellowstone National Park, June 13, 2019.
Rachel Cramer / Yellowstone Public Radio

Vice President Mike Pence visited Yellowstone National Park Thursday to discuss the Park Service’s backlog of maintenance projects. Pence says the Trump administration is committed to conservation and improving national parks infrastructure.

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