Rachel Cramer

Bozeman Reporter

Rachel Cramer is YPR’s Bozeman-based reporter. While her roots are in the rolling hills of southwest Iowa, Rachel fell hard for Montana during family vacations. She started working for Montana Public Radio as a website assistant while finishing a master’s degree at the University of Montana, and joined the news team in 2017. As an evening newscaster and reporter, she covered issues ranging from wolf-rancher conflict solutions to tech start-ups. Later that year, she was selected for a fellowship with Crossing the Divide, a cross-country reporting project developed by the GroundTruth Project and WGBH. Rachel and four other early-career journalists covered divisions in five communities across the US, partnered with local news outlets and visited high schools. Before joining YPR, Rachel worked for Threshold, an award-winning public radio and podcast based in Montana.

Resort residencies in Big Sky, Montana, 2006.
Jim (CC-By-SA-2.0)

A new economic profile report about Big Sky highlights one of the fastest population growth trends in the state and some of the struggles that come with it. Big Sky’s population has grown 21 percent over the last five years to almost 3,000 residents, according to a new economic profile from Bridge Economic Development released this week.

Left to right: Lill Erickson, Roger and Betsy Indreland and Chris Mehus on the Indreland Ranch north of Big Timber, MT, May 09, 2019.
Rachel Cramer / Yellowstone Public Radio

The Earth passed a new threshold this week — an observatory in Hawaii clocked the highest levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide in human history. A number of studies say CO2 is part of what’s driving higher temperatures, drought and longer fire seasons in the West. Now ranchers in Montana are testing out a new program that’s trying to put some of that carbon back in the ground.

The Republican National Committee sent a look-alike census-survey to residents in Montana, May 2019.
Courtesy of the Montana Department of Commerce

The Republican National Committee is sending out policy surveys with the option of enclosing $15 for processing a "Census Document." The Montana Department of Commerce is reminding Montana residents the actual U.S. Census will begin in March 2020 and will not ask for any money.

VDL's Director Greg Juda and Montana's State Veterinarian Marty Zaluski pose in the serology lab room in Bozeman, May 08, 2019.
Rachel Cramer / Yellowstone Public Radio

Montana’s only veterinary diagnostic laboratory plays a big role identifying diseases in livestock and pets. But their current facility in Bozeman is aging and has limited space. With a recently-hired, full-time director, the lab hopes to construct a new building to better serve the needs of animal owners and veterinarians across the state.

The sun sets behind Montana State University's sculpture of Spirit, the school's mascot, April 2019.
Rachel Cramer / Yellowstone Public Radio

Gov. Steve Bullock vetoed a bill Wednesday intended to protect free and peaceful demonstrations in all public outdoor places on college campuses.

A remote Montana ranch in Liberty County, August 16, 2009.
J. Stephen Conn/Flickr User (CC-by-2.0)

The 2020 Census will have a big impact on how federal money and Congressional seats are distributed to states over the next decade. In a rural state like Montana, long distances between residents add extra challenges for getting the complete population count.

Apps on an iPhone, October 20, 2010.
Daniel Go/Flickr (CC-by-2.0)

High tech is one of the fastest-growing and highest-paying sectors in Montana’s economy, but it’s not without its hurdles. An organization helping new tech startups is wrapping up its second annual pitch competition this week. One of the founders of Sellout, a new Bozeman-based tech company and one of the winners last year, shared some of the opportunities and challenges that come with starting a tech business in Montana.

Aerial view of Bozeman, 2008.
Jonesey/Flickr (CC-by-2.0)

The U.S. Census Bureau Deputy Director will host a panel in Bozeman Monday about the upcoming 2020 Census. The Census happens every ten years and there’s a lot at stake for Montana this time around — from federal funding to another congressional seat.

Wheat and barley fields south of Manhattan, Montana, April 27, 2019.
Rachel Cramer / Yellowstone Public Radio

Farming is always a gamble in Montana, but this year a new tariff on wheat and an undefined trade deal with Japan means more uncertainty for farmers as they plant this spring. President Trump discussed agricultural trade negotiations last week with the prime minister of Japan — Montana’s largest importer of wheat. The talk comes two years after Trump pulled the U.S. out of the Trans-Pacific Partnership.

NorthWestern Energy logo
NorthWestern Energy

NorthWestern Energy says its customers in Montana are being targeted by scam phone calls threatening to shut off utilities if they do not pay immediately.

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