Rachel Cramer

Bozeman Reporter

Rachel Cramer is YPR’s Bozeman-based reporter. While her roots are in the rolling hills of southwest Iowa, Rachel fell hard for Montana during family vacations. She started working for Montana Public Radio as a website assistant while finishing a master’s degree at the University of Montana, and joined the news team in 2017. As an evening newscaster and reporter, she covered issues ranging from wolf-rancher conflict solutions to tech start-ups. Later that year, she was selected for a fellowship with Crossing the Divide, a cross-country reporting project developed by the GroundTruth Project and WGBH. Rachel and four other early-career journalists covered divisions in five communities across the US, partnered with local news outlets and visited high schools. Before joining YPR, Rachel worked for Threshold, an award-winning public radio and podcast based in Montana.

Rachel Cramer / Yellowstone Public Radio

Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks is proposing to remove non-native smallmouth bass from Gallatin Valley ponds. The agency says the Midwestern fish could spread to other water bodies — including the blue-ribbon lower Madison River — and drastically reduce trout populations.

Flickr User, Candace Fladager (CC-By-2.0)

 

Farm income in Montana dropped nearly 30 percent from 2012 to 2017, according to the new U.S. Department of Agriculture’s 2017 Census of Agriculture.

Public Domain

A Bozeman company has been awarded one of the first border wall construction contracts to use funds under President Donald Trump’s national emergency declaration. The Army Corps of Engineers gave Barnard Construction a $187 million contract for pedestrian fencing at the US-Mexico border Tuesday.

Rachel Cramer / Yellowstone Public Radio

Free speech and immigration were some of the hot button issues discussed at Montana State University Monday. Young voters shared some of their views at an event with Jeff Sessions, the former US Attorney General.

Flickr User, Tim Lumley (CC-by-2.0)

The Custer Gallatin National Forest is hosting public meetings about a proposal to update its management plan for the next 10 to 15 years. The Forest Service released a draft plan last month that could essentially re-zone sections of the 3 million acre forest and affect how people use it. Two national forests — the Custer and the Gallatin — were combined into one administrative unit in 2014, but it’s still being managed under two separate plans from the 1980s. 

Yellowstone National Park/public domain

Following a record year of deaths for grizzly bears in the Greater Yellowstone, state and federal wildlife managers met in Bozeman this week to discuss efforts to reduce conflicts with humans. 

Aerial view of Bozeman, 2008.
Jonesey/Flickr (CC-by-2.0)

Immigration is a lightning rod issue at the national and local level. Bozeman Public Library will host a panel discussion and Q&A Tuesday to explore the impact of immigration on the economy. 

Rachel Cramer / Yellowstone Public Radio

Several hundred people attended a ground blessing ceremony last Friday for the new American Indian Hall at Montana State University in Bozeman.

Grant Gunghans / Former MSU Racquetball Club President

After two Montana State University gym roofs collapsed in Bozeman earlier this month, MSU has been rushing to move equipment and find alternative spaces on campus for the 1,400 students signed up for fitness classes. Spin sessions have been moved to the third floor of the engineering building. Taekwondo students are now meeting in Romney Gym. But some fitness center users have had to look elsewhere.

Rachel Cramer / Yellowstone Public Radio

Montana State University will host a public ground blessing ceremony for the new American Indian Hall in Bozeman this Friday. Walter Fleming, Department Head and Professor of Native American Studies, says the new hall will be something of a homecoming.

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