All Things Considered

Weekdays from 4PM-6:30PM

On May 3, 1971, at 5 p.m.,  All Things Considered debuted on 90 public radio stations.

In the more than four decades since, almost everything about the program has changed, from the hosts, producers, editors and reporters to the length of the program, the equipment used and even the audience.

However there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

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AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

We're going to bring in Virginia Senator Mark Warner now. He's the top Democrat on the Senate Intelligence Committee. Welcome back to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED.

MARK WARNER: Thanks for having me, Audie.

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AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

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MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

All right. Let's stay with trade and trade fights and bring in someone who has fought quite a few of them. Wendy Cutler was a U.S. trade negotiator for nearly 30 years, serving under five presidents. And she's in the studio now. Welcome.

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MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Eleven-year-old Laila Anderson has an incredibly rare immunodeficiency disease. Because of the disease called HLH, she's had bone marrow transplants and chemotherapy; that has meant some pretty significant hospital stays.

In 2008, fire swept through a Universal Studios Hollywood backlot. The loss was thought to be a few movie sets and film duplicates. But earlier this week, The New York Times published a report revealing that the 2008 fire burned hundreds of thousands of master recordings of genre-spanning, legendary music from the late 1940s to the early '80s as well as digital formats and hard drives from the late '80s up through the early 2000s.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Back in 2008...

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

UNIDENTIFIED REPORTER #1: And we continue to cover breaking news out of Universal City, where a fire is burning on the Universal backlot.

CORNISH: The fire was enormous, about the equivalent of an entire city block. People all over Los Angeles could see the smoke.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

UNIDENTIFIED REPORTER #2: The blaze burned for some 12 hours with 400 firefighters battling to keep it from spreading.

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