Affordable Care Act

People on Medicaid who work rural seasonal jobs in Montana are wondering about the future of their access to health coverage. Montana recently passed a law that, if it gains federal approval and goes into effect as planned in January, would require many Medicaid recipients to prove they work a set number of hours each month.

Next year, premiums for individual health insurance plans in Montana will go down for the first time since the Affordable Care Act took effect. Open enrollment starts Friday.

The roughly 50,000 Montanans who receive health coverage in the Affordable Care Act marketplace could see their premium bills drop by hundreds or thousands of dollars next year.

Thursday, November 1 is the first day of the six-week open enrollment for health insurance plans on the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare. States in the Mountain West are seeing minor rate hikes — if any — this year.

Three states in the Mountain West have ballot initiatives this November focused on expanding access to Medicaid. Over time, these traditionally Republican states appear to have warmed to a program originally linked to the Affordable Care Act.

Kayla Desroches / YPR

There's a lot at stake for the future of the Affordable Care Act in next month's general election.

Voters say health care is among their top concerns and, here in Montana, people are paying attention to what the candidates are saying about "Obamacare" and coverage for patients with pre-existing conditions.

Years after it was approved, the ACA, or Obamacare, has a lot of public support, and there's a lot of opposition to the program too.

courtesy of the Wheeler Center

The former U.S. Ambassador to China, who's also Montana’s longest serving U.S. Senator, is expected to comment on the future of Obamacare and North Korea during a public event next month at Montana State University.

A new report says that Medicaid expansion has saved Montana more than $30 million in its first 18 months.

"Medicaid expansion continues to be a stunning success for Montana," said Shiela Hogan, director of Montana's Department of Health and Human Services. "There's no denying this."

Montana Senator Steve Daines earlier this year.
Jackie Yamanaka / YPR

Two years would be too long for an Affordable Care Act replacement plan, according to Montana Senator Steve Daines.

After the Senate’s attempt to replace the Affordable Care Act collapsed last night, Republicans came up with a different plan: repealing Obamacare and replacing it within the next two years. But that idea failed on Tuesday afternoon. 

In an interview with Yellowstone Public Radio Tuesday morning, Daines said he would support a bill repealing Obamacare, but he would want a replacement plan in action as soon as possible.

Updated at 2:32 p.m. ET

Senate Republicans unveiled their long-awaited health care overhaul proposal on Thursday. The Senate bill, called the "Better Care Reconciliation Act," would repeal major parts of the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare. The broad outlines of it look a lot like the House bill, the American Health Care Act, which was passed in May.

Senate GOP Reveals Health Care Bill

Jun 22, 2017

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