Annita Lucchesi

A woman holds a sign covered in red hand prints that reads "We will never forget."
Kayla Desroches / Yellowstone Public Radio News

 

Families in southeast Montana are demanding law enforcement review all cases of missing and murdered indigenous people in Big Horn, Rosebud, and Yellowstone Counties, to uncover possible revelations about events leading up to known deaths and improve future investigations.

People gather around candles and a picture of Selena Not Afraid at a nighttime vigil.
Olivia Reingold / Yellowstone Public Radio

Update Jan. 23, 2020:  A preliminary autopsy report released Thursday says Selena Not Afraid died of hypothermia. Montana's chief medical examiner at the state crime lab in Billings also found there were no wounds, broken bones or other signs of violence on her body. A toxicology report has not yet been completed and could take several weeks. The following story was published before the autopsy report was released.

Law enforcement and family members are clashing over what they say killed a 16-year-old Crow girl, who was found dead near an Interstate-90 rest stop earlier this week.

A photo of the Keystone Pipeline taken by a Flickr user in 2008.
SHANNONPATRICK17 / FLICKR (CC BY 2.0)


A new report says the Keystone XL pipeline would exacerbate the problem of missing and murdered indigenous women in Montana and other Northern Plains states in the project’s proposed path.

Nadya Kwandibens / The National Inquiry

After two years in the making, the Canadian government released its National Inquiry into missing and murdered indigenous persons on Monday. The report concluded that the violence committed against indigenous communities amounts to a “race-based genocide” by the Canadian government.

Loxie Loring helps lead a march to remember her daughter, Ashley Loring. She went missing from the Blackfeet Reservation over a year ago.
Nate Hegyi / Mountain West News Bureau

There’s a storm rolling in over the Blackfeet Indian Reservation in Montana. The clouds are low and dark as distant lightning cracks over a green prairie. 

Wade Running Crane is starting to get wet.

“This is like a sign from Ashley that she’s here,” he said.