Bozeman

A stethoscope
Lidor/FLICKR (CC-by-NC-ND-2.0)

Urban and rural hospitals in Montana are facing a severe financial crunch as they prepare for an uptick in patients with the COVID-19 illness. The economic stimulus plan approved by the U.S. Senate Wednesday night is expected to help.

Two people hold a can of pepsi and a piece of cake.
Drake Phillips

Update 03/27/30 at 12:30 P.M.: U.S. Sen. Steve Daines's office said in a press release the five men from Bozeman were on a flight back to Montana with help from the American Embassy and General Consul in Dubai.

Five men from Bozeman are among 300 people stuck at the Dubai International Airport after all flights were cancelled indefinitely. The group of friends has spent a week and a half trying to return to the U.S. from a spring break trip to the Philippines. They and their families say they had zero luck using the U.S. State Department’s recommended services for travellers in emergency situations.

Gallatin County Courthouse
Tim Evanson / Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0)

On the heels of a third COVID-19 illness case announced out of Gallatin County Wednesday, the County and the city of Bozeman have declared states of emergency. Existing closures of bars and eateries and now gyms, theaters and other indoor recreational facilities, have been extended into April as part of an effort to slow the spread of the novel coronavirus.

Aerial view of Bozeman, 2008.
Jonesey/Flickr (CC-by-2.0)

Health officers are saying communities need to be prepared for a potentially long-haul disruption to day-to-day life in response to COVID-19. Community volunteers in Bozeman are trying to make life a little easier for their neighbors.

Spire Climbing and Fitness in Bozeman announced March 15, 2020 it would only allow members to use the facility, would no longer allow equipment rentals and limit yoga classes to eight people.
Rachel Cramer/Yellowstone Public Radio

From postponed concerts to virtual campaign events, businesses and politicians across Montana are changing plans after detections of multiple in-state cases of the novel coronavirus.

Around 200 people filled up Inspiration Hall at Montana State University in Bozeman to hear a presentation by Physicist Rob Davies February 18, 2020.
Rachel Cramer / Yellowstone Public Radio

A group of city, state and tribal representatives met this week in Bozeman to share ideas about how to address climate change in Montana. A guest speaker at the conference said Rocky Mountain states are going to see catastrophic changes on our current path.

A piece of war memorabilia spurred an investigation at Montana State University today. Montana State University Police cordoned off a campus parking lot after a defused explosive was discovered in a student’s car.

A man in a mask holds a gun during a simulation crisis intervention in Bozeman, February 14, 2020.
Rachel Cramer / Yellowstone Public Radio

Law enforcement officials in Montana’s fastest growing county say the number of mental health and substance misuse related calls to 911 is going up. Since 2009, a training program has been trying to help first responders work with mental health professionals to better assist people facing a crisis.

Rachel Cramer / Yellowstone Public Radio

Several years ago, Havre, Montana had a problem. Its treated wastewater had too many nutrients. Fixing it was expected to cost millions of dollars. But, wastewater workers discovered a cheap, upcycled solution through the magic of chemistry and beer.

A panel at the BBER Economic Outlook seminar in Bozeman discusses challenges and opportunities to attract more skilled labor, February 5, 2020.
Rachel Cramer / Yellowstone Public Radio

Many Montana companies are struggling to find suitable workers to fill job openings. Researchers and industry experts at a seminar in Bozeman Wednesday say there aren’t enough skilled applicants. But educators say they see opportunities in more apprenticeships.

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