Bozeman

Tom Ferris / Montana History Foundation

 

Between 1901 and 1922, 17 libraries from Missoula to Miles City and Havre to Dillon were built in Montana. There’s a new book that takes us back to the turn of the 20th century, when the generosity of a Scottish immigrant and the vision of 17 Montana communities brought libraries to the far reaches of the state.

The seed money for these libraries in Montana and elsewhere across the U.S. came from one of the richest men of the late 19th and 20th century, Andrew Carnegie, who said that a “library outranks any one thing a community can do to benefit its people.”

Community leaders and affordable housing advocates break ground where 24 townhomes will be built as the Willow Springs Townhomes development in Bozeman, Montana, August 28, 2019.
Rachel Cramer / Yellowstone Public Radio

Construction on Bozeman’s newest affordable housing project begins this week. There’s a waitlist of 200 individuals and families.

The evidence storage room in Gallatin County's Law and Justice Center is running out of room, Bozeman, Montana, August 14, 2019.
Rachel Cramer / Yellowstone Public Radio

Issues like confidentiality, safety and smells from the morgue have plagued the Gallatin County Law and Justice Center for years, according to employees housed in the building. This November, Gallatin County voters will decide whether to fund a bonding measure to replace the Bozeman facility.

As Gallatin County's population grows, more development is moving into land historically used for agriculture. The sign advertises land for sale near Churchill, August 6, 2019.
Rachel Cramer / Yellowstone Public Radio

As Bozeman and its bedroom communities continue to grow, developers have started moving into prime farmland in Gallatin Valley. Farmers and ranchers there are struggling to uphold their way of life, and the valley's scenic views and wildlife corridors could disappear. Renewed funding for conservation easements aims to support the stewards of open land.

Amy Kelley Hoitsma (left) and Suzanne Held (right) visit Tin Works warehouse in Bozeman where the PhotoVoicesNE project will be displayed, July 17, 2019.
Rachel Cramer / Yellowstone Public Radio

As Bozeman undergoes rapid growth and development, a neighborhood north of downtown is trying to preserve its history and quirkiness.

Screenshot of development projects in Bozeman from the city's Community Developer Viewer, July 18, 2019.
Rachel Cramer / Yellowstone Public Radio

A non-profit organization that serves more than 12,000 people in southwest Montana is updating its community needs assessment. It helps determine which projects get the green light and affects how millions of dollars are allocated. Communities across Park, Gallatin and Meagher Counties identified affordable housing as one of the top priorities in the last assessment three years ago.

Chris Fraser's installation in progress for Tinworks Art in Bozeman, July 2019.
Courtesy of Chris Fraser

With an old warehouse slated to be torn down in Bozeman’s historic northeastern neighborhood, a temporary, pop-up art installation aims to celebrate the space and test whether Bozeman would support a permanent art museum.

Travis Swanson
Courtesy of Gallatin County Sheriff's Office

A member of the Gallatin County Sheriff's Office search and rescue team died Sunday during a rock climbing accident.

Representatives from Big Sky School District, Habitat for Humanity and the community dig into the future site of affordable housing for Big Sky teachers, July 12, 2019.
Rachel Cramer / Yellowstone Public Radio

Public schools in Big Sky are losing teachers because their salaries can’t keep up with the median sale price for a single-family house, which currently sits at $1 million. A new partnership to bring affordable, on-site housing to the school district is trying to change that.

The sun sets behind Montana State University's sculpture of Spirit, the school's mascot, April 2019.
Rachel Cramer / Yellowstone Public Radio

Update from the Associated Press at 12:30 P.M. July 12, 2019:

Montana State University officials say an employee will undergo a mental health evaluation after making threatening statements that caused a campus-wide lockdown.

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