brucellosis

A map of the proposed surveillance area provided by the Montana Department of Livestock May 18, 2020.
Montana Department of Livestock

 


Montanans may submit public comment on a proposal to expand the Designated Surveillance Area for brucellosis in the southwest part of the state. If approved, the DSA would expand to include the area between Dillon, Twin Bridges and Alder.

A bull elk searches for food beneath the snow in Yellowstone National Park in February 2020.
Jacob W. Frank/YNP (Public Domain)

Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks announced Monday that an elk herd in the Bangtail Mountains has tested negative for brucellosis. State wildlife managers recently completed the two-year project aimed at understanding the risk and spread of the disease in wildlife and livestock.

Bull bison walk through the snow on the East Entrance Road in Yellowstone National Park on February 5, 2020.
Jacob W. Frank/YNP (Public Domain)

A landowner advocacy group in Montana filed a complaint this week against Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks saying that the department has not thoroughly explored the consequences of allowing free-roaming wild bison in the state.

Elk standing in a field.
Walt Morgan / Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

Several elk in southwestern Montana’s Ruby Mountains have been exposed to brucellosis. State officials say it’s the first time the disease has reached elk in the area.

The Montana Department of Livestock says a brucellosis-infected cow from a Madison County ranch was identified during a voluntary whole-herd test. The animal was euthanized, and the infection confirmed at the National Veterinary Services Laboratories in Iowa. The cow tested negative last year.

A bison raises its head after eating grass beneath the snow in Yellowstone National Park.
NPS/Jacob W. Frank (public domain)

A federal appeals court this week revived a lawsuit filed by an environmental law firm that challenges the state of Montana and the federal government’s management of bison from Yellowstone National Park. 

A semi-truck hauls 33 bison from Yellowstone National Park to the Fort Peck Indian Reservation for the final stage of the quarantine process, December 23, 2019.
Courtesy of Don Woerner

 

Correction: The previous version of this story said it was the first direct transfer of female bison from the park to the tribes through a quarantine program to make sure the animals are disease-free. The bison were held in quarantine at a U.S. Department of Agriculture facility near Gardiner, Montana and loaded into the trailer at Stephens Creek Capture Facility in Yellowstone National Park. YPR regrets the error.   

Thirty-three bison were transferred from Yellowstone National Park to the Assiniboine and Sioux Tribes of the Fort Peck Indian Reservation Monday. It marked the first transfer of female bison to the tribes through the current quarantine program to make sure the animals are disease-free.

A bull bison jumps out of a trailer at the quarantine facility at Fort Peck Indian Reservation, Montana, August 23, 2019.
Rachel Cramer / Yellowstone Public Radio

Fifty-five wild bison were successfully relocated from Yellowstone National Park to the Assiniboine and Sioux Tribes of the Fort Peck Indian Reservation last week. This was the first direct transfer from the park to the tribes through a quarantine program to make sure bison are disease-free.

Cattle grazing
LHOON / Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0)


Montana is expanding the area where cattle producers are required to vaccinate animals at risk for the disease brucellosis. The Montana Department of Livestock will travel the state this month to remind ranchers and address questions ahead of next calving season.

Michael Lusk / Flickr


A bison in the Fort Peck Tribes’ quarantine program died last week. The bull was one of five that were set to join Fort Peck’s burgeoning bison herd this fall.

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