campaign

Republican U.S. Sen. Steve Daines has reported raising more than $1 million over the last three months for his reelection bid in 2020.

All candidates in Montana races for the U.S. House and Senate were required to disclose their quarterly fundraising and spending Monday.

Fact Check: Campaigning On The 'Taxpayer's Dime'

May 23, 2018
Jackie Yamanaka

The charge ‘campaigning on the taxpayer’s dime’ is a perennial issue elected officials confront. This time, U.S. Senate Candidate Russ Fagg has been hammering his primary election opponent Matt Rosendale for doing that and alleging he’s using a “slush” fund to mix official and campaign business.

YPR did some digging into those charges, as well as what may be the long term impact on our democratic institutions.

In the final hours leading up to tomorrow’s special election to fill Montana’s lone U.S. House seat, Democratic candidate Rob Quist is squeezing in a few final visits with voters, and making use of social media. 

Quist’s campaign Facebook and Twitter pages are flooded with testimonials from voters:

The candidates in Thursday's election for the state’s lone seat in the U.S. House are anticipating a close finish, and it’s fueling a final push for voter turnout in the final days on the campaign trail.

The GOP’s Greg Gianforte held the first of three "meet and greet" events Tuesday morning in Great Falls. He stood among a couple dozen supporters under a pavilion at a city park, where local Republican leaders supplied coffee and donuts for the chance to mingle with the candidate.

Candidates and outside groups are dumping more than $12 million into Montana’s short special election race for the U.S. House, surpassing the spending in last year’s race by $3 million. That’s according to the latest federal campaign reports filed this week.

Democratic U.S. House candidate Rob Quist rallied supporters in Kalispell this weekend with the help of Senator Jon Tester. Libertarian candidate Mark Wicks was in Kalispell too, inviting his backers to show off their ugly trucks. Nicky Ouellet reports.

Donald Trump Jr., the head of the NRA, and Republican candidate Greg Gianforte rallied supporters in Butte, Thursday morning, two weeks before voting ends in the special election to decide Montana’s next lone representative in the U.S. House.

When the race started, Democrats saw the May 25 special election as an opportunity for a referendum against President Donald Trump. But Trump Jr. promised the crowd of about 170 supporters gathered outside a mining equipment and supply store just south of Butte’s uptown, that this would be a referendum of a different kind.

Donald Trump Jr. will be making his second visit to Montana today, hitting the campaign trail with Greg Gianforte for a series of rallies across Montana. Gianforte is the Republican candidate vying for Montana’s U.S. House seat in the May 25 special election.

Before Rob Quist became a politician, or toured the country in a bluegrass band, he lived in Cut Bank, a rural Hi-line town near where the Rocky Mountains meet the eastern plains.

The young Quist lived on a ranch just north of the town with his family. Back then, Cut Bank was one of Montana’s big-time oil producers, Quist was his high school’s student body president, and he helped the Cut Bank Wolves win a state basketball championship, leading the team in scoring in the title game.

Twenty-one days before Montana selects its next U.S. Congressman, the Republican candidate stood among a crowd of more than 100 Christians in a small park in Great Falls, joining a national plea to God.

This gathering outside the civic center downtown is a local observance of the National Day of Prayer. It’s been an annual event since the 1950s, when Congress made a law that the president would set aside a day each year for prayer.

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