Chronic Wasting Disease

White Tailed Deer
Fishhawk / Flickr CC BY 2.0

Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks on May 19 announced the first suspected case of chronic wasting disease in a new area in the southwest corner of the state.

Mule deer
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service / U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Officials say Montana hunters will be able to submit meat for chronic wasting disease testing within the state by the next hunting season.

Thirteen percent of the white-tailed deer in the town of Libby could be infected with chronic wasting disease (CWD), the highest prevalence rate in the state. Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks said this fall’s sampling efforts determined prevalence is almost three times the agency’s threshold for more aggressive management actions.

A moose standing in water.
Alex Butterfield / (CC BY-ND 2.0)

This year brought unsettling news for Montana hunters and lovers of wild game meat: For the first time, a wild elk and a wild moose were found infected with chronic wasting disease.

A herd of Elk.
Bob Danley / (CC BY-SA 2.0)


Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks is holding four public meetings in south-central Montana in January to discuss hunting regulations and seasons for the next two years.

Montana wildlife officials announced Wednesday that a white-tailed deer in southwest Montana has, for the first time, tested positive for chronic wasting disease. The deer population in the Ruby Valley is dense, which could fuel transmission.

Montana wildlife managers say 91 cases of chronic wasting disease (CWD) have been found statewide so far this year. The Libby area accounts for nearly half of those detections and that number is expected to grow with results still rolling in from this year’s big game season.

A moose in Montana has tested positive for chronic wasting disease (CWD) for the first time. The finding expands the area wildlife managers believed the disease to exist.

The moose was killed north of Troy, just a half of a mile outside of the Libby CWD management zone, which spans a 10-mile radius around Libby. Thirty white-tailed deer have tested positive for CWD within the management zone since the disease was discovered this spring.

Mule deer
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service / U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Montana wildlife officials say a mule deer buck harvested during archery season northeast of Joliet tested positive for Chronic Wasting Disease.

Both deer and elk rifle hunting seasons opened across the state Saturday and hunters hiked into the woods at the crack of dawn in the hopes of coming out with some fresh meat to stock their freezers. That ritual was a little different this year for hunters in the Libby area, where chronic wasting disease (CWD) has been detected in white-tailed deer.

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