Dillon

Sean Claffey, coordinator for the Southwest Montana Sagebrush Partnership, walks past curl-leaf mountain mahogany in the sagebrush steppe on land managed by the DNRC near Dillon, Montana, May 12, 2020.
Rachel Cramer/Yellowstone Public Radio

 

Sagebrush grasslands in southwest Montana have been disappearing for decades, putting ranchers and wildlife in jeopardy. A project is aiming to reverse this trend and engage a local workforce left in limbo by the novel coronavirus.

Two invasive mussels detected on March 16th at the Dillon check station.
Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks

 

Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks announced Mar. 30 that inspectors in Dillon intercepted three boats infested with invasive mussels since Mar. 16. FWP says news about the novel coronavirus caused a big spike in boat traffic as people returned home.

Tom Ferris / Montana History Foundation

 

Between 1901 and 1922, 17 libraries from Missoula to Miles City and Havre to Dillon were built in Montana. There’s a new book that takes us back to the turn of the 20th century, when the generosity of a Scottish immigrant and the vision of 17 Montana communities brought libraries to the far reaches of the state.

The seed money for these libraries in Montana and elsewhere across the U.S. came from one of the richest men of the late 19th and 20th century, Andrew Carnegie, who said that a “library outranks any one thing a community can do to benefit its people.”