Education

Montana Gov. Steve Bullock says school districts won’t need to make up any in-person instructional time missed during the two-week statewide closure he ordered Sunday. Local school boards will, however, need to approve plans for remote learning and other services to maintain state funding if the closures are extended.

The Montana Office of Public Instruction is asking Gov. Steve Bullock and the federal government to waive requirements for standardized testing and instructional time. The request comes days into the governor’s two-week public school closure order in response to the novel coronavirus.

Even as Montana's public K-12 schools sit closed over coronavirus concerns, work on the school system continues. Newly released data from the state of Montana provides a picture of just how much it costs to educate the state's students.

Released this week, the state's "report card" shows it cost an average of $10,474.64 to educate each student in the public school system last year. The actual cost varies depending on districts or schools.

The U.S. Department of Education has agreed to delay a new rule that could pull significant funding from rural and low-income schools in Montana. The delay follows objections this week from Montana’s U.S. Senators and other high ranking members of Congress.

Community 7 Television / Community 7 Television

 

The largest school district in Montana plans to cut 40 full time positions to make up for an over $4 million budget deficit.

A Montana case before the U.S. Supreme Court could have far-reaching implications for public education funding and the debate over the separation of church and state. Two candidates in the U.S. House race — one Democrat and one Republican — are running away from the pack in fundraising. A controversial tribal water compact could become an issue in the governor's race. And the three Republican candidates for governor square off in their first debate. Listen now on Campaign Beat.

The U.S. Supreme Court hears arguments Wednesday in a major case that could dramatically alter the line separating church and state.

At issue is a Montana state constitutional amendment that bars direct and indirect taxpayer aid to religious institutions. Conservative religious groups and advocates of school choice are challenging the "no-aid" provision.

Ethelyn Howard, wearing a reflective yellow vest and holding a stop sign, stands on the sidewalk next to a street crosswalk.
Kay Erickson / Yellowstone Public Radio


It has been a cold and snowy week for much of Montana, making it necessary for schools to change their routine.

A yellow school bus.
Shinichi Sugiyama / Flickr (CC BY 2.0)


The largest school district in Montana plans to cut up to 40 full time employees to make up for a more than $4 million budget deficit.

A yellow school bus.
Shinichi Sugiyama / Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

A new report says that indigenous students are disproportionately disciplined in Montana public schools.  Study authors say more support instead of discipline could lead to higher academic achievement rates.

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