Fort Peck Assiniboine and Sioux Tribes

A photo taken on September 28, 2010 of the Blackfeet Nation Tribe sign
Loco Steve / Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

Native American tribes in Montana are beginning to use federal funds to bolster their response to the novel coronavirus.

The Crow Tribe announced they received $25 million from the U.S. Treasury. The Little Shell Chippewa Tribe received $25 million, per Chairman Gerald Gray. According to the office of Sen. Steve Daines, the Fort Peck Assiniboine and Sioux tribes received over $24 million.

A photo of Prairiedawn Thunderchild, Tahnee Thunderchild, Lance Fourstar, Catherine Bear, Delberta Eagleman, Angeline Cheek, Vermae Taylor and Cheyenne Foote taken Apr. 14, 2020.
Curtis Yaz


This week, tribal members who protested the Keystone XL oil pipeline construction earlier this month submitted statements to a federal judge that they witnessed workers breaking social distancing protocol.

A photo of Prairiedawn Thunderchild, Tahnee Thunderchild, Lance Fourstar, Catherine Bear, Delberta Eagleman, Angeline Cheek, Vermae Taylor and Cheyenne Foote taken Apr. 14, 2020.
Curtis Yaz

 Updated 04/15/20, 6:10 p.m.

A federal judge Thursday will consider tribes’ request to put a hold on oil pipeline construction in northeastern Montana in light of coronavirus concerns.

Tribal members gathered this week in Phillips County to protest the ongoing construction of the Keystone XL pipeline.

A welcome sign for Crow Country.
Olivia Reingold / Yellowstone Public Radio

Montana’s tribal nations say their first responders and medical professionals are short on equipment needed to protect health care workers from the coronavirus.

Olivia Reingold / Yellowstone Public Radio

 

The public had its first and only chance to meet with State Department officials about a new environmental analysis of the Keystone XL pipeline Tuesday. 

Olivia Reingold / Yellowstone Public Radio

The U.S. Department of Justice announced it’s awarding four tribal governments in Montana a collective $2.9 million to improve public safety efforts.

A bull bison jumps out of a trailer at the quarantine facility at Fort Peck Indian Reservation, Montana, August 23, 2019.
Rachel Cramer / Yellowstone Public Radio

Fifty-five wild bison were successfully relocated from Yellowstone National Park to the Assiniboine and Sioux Tribes of the Fort Peck Indian Reservation last week. This was the first direct transfer from the park to the tribes through a quarantine program to make sure bison are disease-free.

Michael Lusk / Flickr


A bison in the Fort Peck Tribes’ quarantine program died last week. The bull was one of five that were set to join Fort Peck’s burgeoning bison herd this fall.

IHS seal
IHS / Wikimedia Commons


The federal Indian Health Service has failed to meet its own standards for prescribing opioids. That’s the takeaway from a federal audit released last week, by the inspector general of the U.S. Health and Human Services Department.

Three bison walk through sagebrush in front of snowcapped mountains.
Jacob Byk / National Wildlife Federation


Five bison from Montana’s Fort Peck Assiniboine and Sioux Tribes arrived on the Wind River Reservation in Wyoming Wednesday night. The exchange is part of an effort to restore bison populations across Indian Country.