Fort Peck Indian Reservation

Bison move through the Lamar Valley in Yellowstone National Park on October 14, 2015.
Public Domain

Eleven bull bison quarantined in a federal facility near Yellowstone National Park were transferred to the Fort Peck Indian Reservation on June 24. There, they’ll complete the final phase of a program to make sure they are disease free before being sent out to start or boost herds across the U.S.

An organization that runs warming centers for people experiencing homelessness in Bozeman and Livingston says it needs thousands of dollars in community donations, or they may have to close their doors during winter.

A semi-truck hauls 33 bison from Yellowstone National Park to the Fort Peck Indian Reservation for the final stage of the quarantine process, December 23, 2019.
Courtesy of Don Woerner

 

Correction: The previous version of this story said it was the first direct transfer of female bison from the park to the tribes through a quarantine program to make sure the animals are disease-free. The bison were held in quarantine at a U.S. Department of Agriculture facility near Gardiner, Montana and loaded into the trailer at Stephens Creek Capture Facility in Yellowstone National Park. YPR regrets the error.   

Thirty-three bison were transferred from Yellowstone National Park to the Assiniboine and Sioux Tribes of the Fort Peck Indian Reservation Monday. It marked the first transfer of female bison to the tribes through the current quarantine program to make sure the animals are disease-free.

A bull bison jumps out of a trailer at the quarantine facility at Fort Peck Indian Reservation, Montana, August 23, 2019.
Rachel Cramer / Yellowstone Public Radio

Fifty-five wild bison were successfully relocated from Yellowstone National Park to the Assiniboine and Sioux Tribes of the Fort Peck Indian Reservation last week. This was the first direct transfer from the park to the tribes through a quarantine program to make sure bison are disease-free.

Michael Lusk / Flickr


A bison in the Fort Peck Tribes’ quarantine program died last week. The bull was one of five that were set to join Fort Peck’s burgeoning bison herd this fall.

IHS seal
IHS / Wikimedia Commons


The federal Indian Health Service has failed to meet its own standards for prescribing opioids. That’s the takeaway from a federal audit released last week, by the inspector general of the U.S. Health and Human Services Department.

Yellowstone National Park Superintendent Cameron (Cam) Sholly in his office at Mammoth Hot Springs, November 2018.
Public Domain

The new superintendent of Yellowstone National Park says shuttles could be the key to easing congestion, though he doesn't think recent growth in visitor numbers will continue. Cam Sholly, who came to Yellowstone last October, adds the park can’t solve its bison management problems without better cooperation between the state of Montana and American Indian tribes.

Investigators with the U.S. Department of Education are in Wolf Point this week investigating claims of racial discrimination.
Wolf Point Public Schools


Federal investigators are in northeast Montana this week looking into alleged racial discrimination in public schools.

Three investigators from the U.S. Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights’ Seattle region spent Monday speaking with Wolf Point School District administrators and families.

Fort Peck Tribes File Federal Complaint Against Wolf Point School District

Jun 30, 2017
[url=https://flic.kr/p/risMaC][img]https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8615/16606524482_df2613dabb_k.jpg[/img][/url][url=https://flic.kr/p/risMaC]Globe[/url] by [url=https://www.flickr.com/photos/litratcher/]Wendy Cope[/url], on Flickr
Wendy Cope

The Assiniboine and Sioux tribes have filed a Title VI complaint against the Wolf Point school district.

This is the first time tribes have filed a complaint to the federal Departments of Justice and Education on their children’s behalf, based on school policy, in a school district that has a majority Native population.  

On NPR's All Things Considered Sunday, Amy Martin reported on the second-largest ever cull of Yellowstone Bison this winter.

More than 1,200 bison were killed, more than at any time since 2007-2008.

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