Gardiner

Three bison walk through the snow at Yellowstone National Park.
NPS/FLICKR (Public Domain)

The U.S. Department of Justice recently asked a federal court to dismiss a Gardiner woman’s claim for half a million dollars in compensation from the winter bison hunt north of Yellowstone National Park. 

Bison graze in Lamar Valley in Yellowstone National Park, August 18, 2016.
NPS/Neal Herbert (Public Domain)

State, federal and tribal representatives tasked with managing bison in and around Yellowstone National Park voted again Tuesday to reduce the herd size as animals migrate out of the park this winter. 

It’s fall and that means it’s prescribed fire season in Montana. Wildland managers are now intentionally setting fires to reduce forest fuel buildup or to restore native vegetation.

Two prescribed wildfire operations just north of Missoula produced dense smoke that degraded air quality to unhealthy levels Wednesday night into Thursday morning. As weather forecasters predicted though, a cold front pushed into the region Thursday afternoon, increasing winds which helped dissipate the smoke.

A bull bison jumps out of a trailer at the quarantine facility at Fort Peck Indian Reservation, Montana, August 23, 2019.
Rachel Cramer / Yellowstone Public Radio

Fifty-five wild bison were successfully relocated from Yellowstone National Park to the Assiniboine and Sioux Tribes of the Fort Peck Indian Reservation last week. This was the first direct transfer from the park to the tribes through a quarantine program to make sure bison are disease-free.

The Yellowstone River Bridge connects the north and south sides of Gardiner, Montana, June 30, 2009.
Spencereblake/FLICKR (CC BY-NC 2.0)

The Montana Department of Transportation will renovate a historic bridge that connects the north and south sides of Gardiner, starting September 03. Drivers should expect delays.

Three bison walk through the snow at Yellowstone National Park.
NPS/FLICKR (Public Domain)

A group of Gardiner residents are pushing for new restrictions to the annual bison hunt near Yellowstone National Park’s north entrance. But at a recent interagency meeting, tribal representatives say some of these changes would violate their treaty rights.

Yellowstone National Park's north entrance by Gardiner, Montana, May 16, 2019.
Rachel Cramer / Yellowstone Public Radio

Law enforcement is still investigating a human-caused fire that temporarily closed the north entrance of Yellowstone National Park Friday. Rachel Cramer with Yellowstone Public Radio News reports.

Mammoth Hot Springs in Yellowstone National Park releases steam into the bright blue sky, May 2019.
Rachel Cramer / Yellowstone Public Radio

Yellowstone National Park is famous for its explosive geysers, bubbling mud pots and psychedelic hot springs. Some visitors don’t realize it’s all part of a very large, active volcanic system. Others worry it’s going to erupt at any moment. Michael Poland, the Scientist-in-Charge of the Yellowstone Volcano Observatory, busts some myths and shares what’s really happening below the surface.

Richard Parks' shows one of the fishing flies in Park's Fly Shop in Gardiner, MT, May 16, 2019.
Rachel Cramer / Yellowstone Public Radio

Tourism is the economic lifeblood for many gateway communities around Yellowstone National Park. In Gardiner, Montana, a second-generation fly shop is gearing up for its busiest season.

Yellowstone National Park Superintendent Cameron (Cam) Sholly in his office at Mammoth Hot Springs, November 2018.
Public Domain

The new superintendent of Yellowstone National Park says shuttles could be the key to easing congestion, though he doesn't think recent growth in visitor numbers will continue. Cam Sholly, who came to Yellowstone last October, adds the park can’t solve its bison management problems without better cooperation between the state of Montana and American Indian tribes.

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