Greg Gianforte

Donald Trump, Jr., Susan Gianforte, Kristen Juras and Kimberly Guilfoyle at a fundraising event at Lone Mountain Ranch on June 30, 2020.
Kristen Juras / Facebook

 

News broke on Fourth of July that a handful of Montana’s high-profile elected officials and political candidates were potentially exposed to COVID-19 during two of President Donald Trump’s reelection campaign events. This week, we learned where those events took place and who attended. YPR News’ Kevin Trevellyan spoke with Maritsa Georgiou of NBC Montana, who had the scoop.

Matt Rosendale is sworn in January 2, 2017 as Montana State Auditor at the state Capitol. He was joined by his wife Jean. Rosendale served as Senate Majority Leader in the 2015 Montana Legislature.
Jackie Yamanaka / Yellowstone Public Radio

Montana State Auditor Matthew Rosendale says he’s tested negative for the novel coronavirus a week after being potentially exposed at a GOP fundraising event in Gallatin County.

U.S. Sen. Jon Tester holds a Facebook town hall to discuss health care on June 30, 2020.
Kevin Trevellyan/Yellowstone Public Radio

 

U.S. Senator Jon Tester joined other congressional Democrats this week in rebuking the Trump administration's latest attempt to overturn the Affordable Care Act, known as Obamacare. 

2020 Montana Elections image
Yellowstone Public Radio

 

The two leading candidates to become Montana’s next governor edged closer in fundraising over the last month reported. 

Senate Passes Bill Permanently Funding Public Land Management Programs

Jun 17, 2020

The U.S. Senate on Wednesday passed a landmark bill to permanently fund public lands management programs and maintenance in national parks.

*UPDATED 06/13 

The U.S. Agriculture Secretary visited Missoula Friday to announce a blueprint to prioritize work for the U.S Forest Service.

Supporters say it will modernize the agency and cut unnecessary red tape. Opponents, however, counter it will undermine the nation’s laws aimed at protecting the environment.

Rachel Cramer

Montana’s first all mail-in ballot primary election didn’t provide many surprises last night. But it did produce several high profile general election races.

There's still time to get your ballot in before Tuesday's primary, but you'll need to deliver it in person. Voter turnout could be heading to a new record for a primary. New ads in the Senate and gubernatorial races follow political playbooks. Democrats seek to increase Native American participation. And some key primary races could set the future direction of the state Republican Party.

Listen now on Campaign Beat, with Sally Mauk, Rob Saldin and Holly Michels.

The U.S. capitol building
Public Domain


With no incumbent seeking reelection, Montana’s lone seat in the U.S. House of Representatives is once again up for grabs. Republicans are trying to prevent a Democrat from flipping the seat blue for the first time in more than 20 years.

Two Democrats, six Republicans and a Green Party candidate are trying to succeed current Republican Congressman Greg Gianforte, who is running for governor.

The governor's mansion in Helena, Mont.
Montana Office of Tourism


Heading into this election cycle, Republicans control both chambers of Montana’s Legislature. If they keep those majorities and win the governor's office, it'll be the first time since 2004 the GOP could control both those branches of the Montana state government. Democrats, meanwhile, are hoping to keep their decade-and-a-half hold on the executive.

With incumbent Gov. Steve Bullock termed out, two Democrats, three Republicans, a Libertarian and a Green Party candidate are vying to become Montana’s next chief executive.

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