Montana Healthcare Foundation

Nurses administer a nasal swab to test people for the COVID-19 illness at a surveillance testing event in Crow Agency May 27, 2020.
Nicky Ouellet / Yellowstone Public Radio

Last weekend, Montana saw its biggest spike yet in COVID-19 cases. YPR reports how the disease is impacting Native Americans across the state.

Ajay Suresh / Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

A recent report from The Montana Department of Health and Human Services found that medication-assisted treatments for opioid addiction are becoming more accessible throughout the state. 

The ophthalmoscope (left) and stethoscope (right) are some of the tools a physican uses when checking a patient's health.
Adrian Clark / Flickr (CC BY-NA 2.0)


Montana healthcare professionals met this week to discuss how to support a person’s physical and mental health in the midst of reduced services.

jarmoluk / Needpix

  Montana received almost $4 million in federal funds for addiction recovery and treatment this week.

Homeless Man Sleeps In A Doorway
Carl Campbell / Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0)

A new report says Montana could save money on Medicaid by providing housing and support services to homeless people.

Paul Fisher / Flickr

Three youth advocacy groups in Yellowstone County are pooling their resources.

Tumbleweed, the Boys and Girls Clubs of Yellowstone County, and the Yellowstone Boys and Girls Ranch are in the first few months of a pilot program.

More than 70,000 Montanans would lose health coverage under the health care bill being considered by Congress, and the state would lose $4.8 billion in federal funding.

The Montana Healthcare Foundation announced today a series of listening sessions across the state to assess the impact of substance abuse on Montana communities.

Earlier this year, Montana’s Attorney General Tim Fox launched Aid Montana, a statewide initiative combining enforcement, treatment and education efforts to tackle drug abuse. 

There's a narrative about the methamphetamine epidemic in Montana that says the state tackled it in the 2000s, yet now it's back with a vengeance because of super labs and drug cartels in Mexico. But here on the Fort Belknap Indian Reservation, it never really went away.

"Getting high in your car in front of the store; that ain't a big deal," says Miranda Kirk.