Northern Cheyenne Tribe

Women lie face down in the street. One, with a red handprint painted on her face in honor of missing and murdered indigenous women, looks at the camera.
Nicky Ouellet / Yellowstone Public Radio

Over the past week thousands of people across Montana turned out for locally-organized rallies in support of black Americans and against police brutality. The rallies drew disparate crowds, and while talk got heated at times, the events remained non-violent.

A photo taken on September 28, 2010 of the Blackfeet Nation Tribe sign
Loco Steve / Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

Native American tribes in Montana are beginning to use federal funds to bolster their response to the novel coronavirus.

The Crow Tribe announced they received $25 million from the U.S. Treasury. The Little Shell Chippewa Tribe received $25 million, per Chairman Gerald Gray. According to the office of Sen. Steve Daines, the Fort Peck Assiniboine and Sioux tribes received over $24 million.

A pile of coal, 2012.
bartb_pt/Flickr (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)


A federal judge in Montana heard arguments May 13 in a case where environmental advocacy groups say coal leasing under the Trump Administration breaks federal law.

Participants in one of the Women in Ranching Circles gather at the J Bar L Ranch near Twin Bridges, Montana in August 2019.
Courtesy of the Women in Ranching Program

Ranching can be an isolating profession in a good year. But the coronavirus pandemic has disrupted the few staples of social contact women ranchers rely on. A program led by a woman in Garfield County, Montana is forging new ways of connecting that will likely outlast the pandemic.

A photo of Prairiedawn Thunderchild, Tahnee Thunderchild, Lance Fourstar, Catherine Bear, Delberta Eagleman, Angeline Cheek, Vermae Taylor and Cheyenne Foote taken Apr. 14, 2020.
Curtis Yaz

 Updated 04/15/20, 6:10 p.m.

A federal judge Thursday will consider tribes’ request to put a hold on oil pipeline construction in northeastern Montana in light of coronavirus concerns.

Tribal members gathered this week in Phillips County to protest the ongoing construction of the Keystone XL pipeline.

People gather around candles and a picture of Selena Not Afraid at a nighttime vigil.
Olivia Reingold / Yellowstone Public Radio

Update Jan. 23, 2020:  A preliminary autopsy report released Thursday says Selena Not Afraid died of hypothermia. Montana's chief medical examiner at the state crime lab in Billings also found there were no wounds, broken bones or other signs of violence on her body. A toxicology report has not yet been completed and could take several weeks. The following story was published before the autopsy report was released.

Law enforcement and family members are clashing over what they say killed a 16-year-old Crow girl, who was found dead near an Interstate-90 rest stop earlier this week.

The tribal seal of the Northern Cheyenne Tribe
The Northern Cheyenne Tribe / Facebook

 

The former president of the Northern Cheyenne Tribe was sentenced to six months in federal prison for fraud Thursday.

Four tall stacks billow white steam into a blue sky
Jackie Yamanaka / Yellowstone Public Radio

One of the owners of the Colstrip power plant Thursday agreed to financially withdraw by 2025.

Jackie Yamanaka/YPR news

Early voting started today in Montana for the mid-term elections. 

Some Native American voters say the satellite election offices on the reservations will make it easier for them to exercise their right to vote.

New Program Reaches Out To Drug Addicted Pregnant Women

May 30, 2018
Jackie Yamanaka

The Northern Cheyenne tribe and St. Vincent Healthcare are partners in a new program that changes the way pregnant women, suffering from addiction, are treated.  Instead of being greeted with blame and punishment these women are being met with support services.