Steve Bullock

Screenshot of Steve Bullock
Screen capture from CNN / Yellowstone Public Radio


Montana Governor Steve Bullock staked out moderate terrain in his presidential debate debut last night in Detroit Tuesday.

New analysis from the state health department shows the new Medicaid work requirements set to take effect on Jan. 1 will apply to more Montanans than expected — up to three times more.

Gov. Steve Bullock Friday named the 18 members of his new grizzly bear management council. The appointees are roughly equal parts ranchers and conservation policy advocates.

Senator Steve Daines
Joel Kowsky / Flickr (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)


A group of rabbis in Montana sent an open letter to Republican U.S. Sen. Steve Daines this week following his recent Tweet in support of Pres. Donald Trump.

Governor Steve Bullock’s presidential campaign has raised more than $2 million since kicking off in mid-May. 

two wolves standing together
Jeremy Weber / Flickr (CC BY 2.0)


Hunters and anglers in Montana can now fund wolf mitigation and control efforts. The optional donation on licenses comes from a bill signed into law this legislative session.

Gov. Steve Bullock’s presidential campaign has agreed to pay for the travel, lodging and meals of the Montana Highway Patrol security detail accompanying him on out-of-state campaign travel.

Bullock’s official staff signed-off on an agreement earlier this month to pay for the expenses after Attorney General Tim Fox ordered a stop to the security. As of publication time the exact cost of the security detail has not been made public. 

Montana’s Medicaid expansion now covers more than 92,000 people. Its future was in question earlier this year when state lawmakers debated whether to continue it, and if so, how.

Conservative lawmakers campaigned to scrap expansion altogether. More moderate Republicans pushed for adding work requirements for enrollees — something not allowed under the Obama administration but OK'd by President Trump.

The 2018 Infrastructure Report Card says Montana will need $1.15 billion to address immediate water needs over the next 20 years.
Joe Shlabotnik/FLICKR (CC-by-2.0)

Fourteen Montana communities will receive a total of $6.5 million of federal funds this year for local infrastructure, housing development and job creation projects. That’s almost a million dollars over last year.

Candidates for statewide office in Montana’s 2020 election raised more than $1.4 million since the start of the year, most of that coming over the last three months. Candidates were required to file campaign finance reports by Friday.

Most of the early money coming in is taking sides in the contested Republican primary for governor.

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