Tribal Issues

A welcome sign for Crow Country.
Olivia Reingold / Yellowstone Public Radio

Montana’s tribal nations say their first responders and medical professionals are short on equipment needed to protect health care workers from the coronavirus.

The tribal seal for the Little Shell Tribe of Chippewa Indians.
Little Shell Tribe / Montana Little Shell Tribe of Chippewa Indians

The Indian Health Service is facilitating coronavirus testing in tribal communities across the United States and in Montana. 

After receiving pressure from congressional lawmakers, the Indian Health Service is providing some members of the U.S. Senate with redacted report on its response to a former doctor’s abuse patients in Montana and South Dakota. Released this week, the document details the failed oversight on former doctor Stanley Patrick Weber as he abused young Native-American boys.

A press release from the Crow Tribe Executive Branch announcing an emergency declaration due to the coronavirus pandemic.
Crow Tribe Executive Branch / Twitter


Multiple tribes in Montana declared states of emergency over the weekend following the confirmation of six presumptive COVID-19 cases in the state.

The state Missing Indigenous Persons Task Force has awarded its first $25,000 grant to Blackfeet Community College to develop what will be the first piece in a statewide tribal network tracking missing Native American persons.

Kayla Desroches / Yellowstone Public Radio


As organizations on the Crow Reservation in south-central Montana prepare coronavirus contingency plans, some tribal members say the threat of coronavirus is still too distant to be an immediate source of concern.

 

Yellowstone Public Radio News reports Crow tribal government is in contact with state public health officials and, like other tribes in the state, are preparing for the possibility of the coronavirus reaching their communities.

A woman holds a sign covered in red hand prints that reads "We will never forget."
Kayla Desroches / Yellowstone Public Radio News

A federal task force created to improve investigations of missing and murdered indigenous people on Mar. 2 announced a series of listening sessions and consultations, including one in Billings.

A woman holds a sign covered in red hand prints that reads "We will never forget."
Kayla Desroches / Yellowstone Public Radio News

 

Families in southeast Montana are demanding law enforcement review all cases of missing and murdered indigenous people in Big Horn, Rosebud, and Yellowstone Counties, to uncover possible revelations about events leading up to known deaths and improve future investigations.

Hanna Harris holding her daughter.
MTV True Life Crime / MTV

 

The story of a Northern Cheyenne woman will be featured in two national pop-culture shows this week. The Dr. Oz Show and MTV are airing episodes about Hanna Harris, who went missing and was murdered in 2013.

A woman in a red t-shirt stands holding a poster in front of a crowd seated at desks in a college classroom setting.
Olivia Reingold / Yellowstone Public Radio

 

The Montana Missing Idigenous Persons Task Force hosted a public meeting in Billings Feb. 6. Some community members pressed for Native people to form a task force of their own.

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