Tribal Issues

The entrance to the Fort Peck Nation on highway 408 in northeastern Montana.
Olivia Reingold / Yellowstone Public Radio

An earlier version of this story incorrectly stated Alexander Smith's age as 24. He is 20. 

The Fort Peck Tribes swore in a new Tribal government Monday. Tribal members elected five newcomers to Tribal Council while upholding the current chairman.

A statue of a miner
Phil Guest / Flickr CC BY 2.0


Coal workers in Montana are out of a job until a Navajo-owned company and the state settle a dispute over the extent to which the Tribe is subject to state environmental law.

Shane Thomas McMillan / University of Montana School of Journalism’s Native News Project

A federal lawsuit challenging how the Federal Bureau of Investigations handled a Crow man’s death will go to trial after a decade-long fight in court.

Olivia Reingold / Yellowstone Public Radio

The U.S. Department of Justice announced it’s awarding four tribal governments in Montana a collective $2.9 million to improve public safety efforts.

A screenshot from the controversial pep rally video
KHQ.com

After a video that some say depicts Native Americans in a reductive light was shown at a pep rally at a northern Montana high school a few weeks ago, two school districts are grappling with which matters more: intent or interpretation?

U.S. Senate Committee on Indian Affairs

A Fort Belknap council member briefed the U.S. Senate Committee on Indian Affairs Wednesday about roadblocks to homeownership.

Montana still officially celebrates October 14 as Columbus Day, but a handful of cities here have replaced it with Indigenous Peoples Day.

Some local leaders refuse to recognize a day that they say glorifies colonization and mistreatment of Native Americans. Missoula is one of those cities.

A screenshot from the controversial pep rally video
KHQ.com


A Montana high school is investigating a video that has offended some community members for its depiction of Native Americans.

Members of Montana's Missing Indigenous Persons Task Force met for their second meeting in Great Falls August 10.
Tim Fox via Twitter

Tribal leaders in Montana are pulling out of the Attorney General’s task force for missing and murdered indigenous people after he announced his intent to support the Keystone XL pipeline in court.

Native advocates and the Blackfeet Nation late last week held what is being called the first-ever Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women Tribunal in the U.S. The testimony from the families of missing and murdered Native people will be delivered to Congressional lawmakers in a push for policy change. Most family members focused on their frustrations with law enforcement.

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