Wheat

Close-up of wheat crops along Highway 2
Roy Luck / Flickr (CC-BY-2.0)

Montana Governor Steve Bullock announced Friday that farmers in more than a dozen counties will be eligible for federal assistance after significant crop losses from excessive rain and snow last year.

A sign advertises American beef in a Japanese grocery store during a U.S. Department of Agriculture trade mission in June, 2018.
Oregon Department of Agriculture/FLICKR (CC-by-NC-ND-2.0)

The new trade deal between the U.S. and Japan went into effect Wednesday. Montana’s Farm Bureau vice president says it will give the state’s farmers and ranchers more certainty and a competitive edge in the new decade.

A lavander field.
osde8info / Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0)

 

Federal crop insurance is a safety net for many farmers and rural communities but it typically favors the big commodities like corn, soybeans, wheat and cotton. A few years ago, a new type of insurance emerged to cover everything grown or raised on a farm under one umbrella, even specialty crops like hemp and lavender that don’t have their own policies. It’s been slow to catch on but a few modifications may entice more farmers to get on board in 2020. 

Wheat and barley fields south of Manhattan, Montana, April 27, 2019.
Rachel Cramer / Yellowstone Public Radio

2019 was a weird year for agricultural production in Montana. That’s according to one of the presenters at the upcoming Agricultural Economics Outlook Conference in Bozeman this Friday.

Wheat and barley fields south of Manhattan, Montana, April 27, 2019.
Rachel Cramer / Yellowstone Public Radio

Montana Senator Jon Tester sent an invitation Tuesday to President Donald Trump to meet wheat producers in Big Sandy. It comes in response to concerns over the President’s recent comments mocking the role of wheat in trade deals with Japan.

Montana senator and wheat farmer Jon Tester is firing back after President Trump mocked the role of wheat in trade with Japan. 

Wheat and barley fields south of Manhattan, Montana, April 27, 2019.
Rachel Cramer / Yellowstone Public Radio

Farming is always a gamble in Montana, but this year a new tariff on wheat and an undefined trade deal with Japan means more uncertainty for farmers as they plant this spring. President Trump discussed agricultural trade negotiations last week with the prime minister of Japan — Montana’s largest importer of wheat. The talk comes two years after Trump pulled the U.S. out of the Trans-Pacific Partnership.

KAMUT wheat plant
Forest and Kim Starr / Flickr

Big Sandy farmer Bob Quinn was a child in the mid-1960s when a stranger at a county fair gave him a few kernels of an unusual grain that changed his life in ways he describes in his new book, Grain by Grain: A Quest to Revive Ancient Wheat, Rural Jobs and Healthy Food. He wrote the book with Stanford University lecturer Liz Carlisle.

Yellowstone Public Radio’s Sarah Brown sat down with Quinn to talk about what modern farming of ancient grains means for the environment, the economy and the eater.

Field Days: Wheat Delivery

Jun 18, 2018
Matt Brown

On this episode of Field Days, Stillwater County farmer Phil Davey delivers the last of 2017's wheat crop.


Neha Viswanathan / Flickr Creative Commons

Montana farmers planted fewer acres of wheat this year than they have in the past, thanks to significantly lower prices last year for the crop.

This year’s crop across the country is just under 46 million acres, the smallest since 1919.

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