White-Tailed Deer

Thirteen percent of the white-tailed deer in the town of Libby could be infected with chronic wasting disease (CWD), the highest prevalence rate in the state. Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks said this fall’s sampling efforts determined prevalence is almost three times the agency’s threshold for more aggressive management actions.

The number of white-tailed deer infected with Chronic Wasting Disease continues to climb in Libby. Eighteen white-tailed deer have now tested positive since the count started this spring.

Hunter-harvested deer are expected to shed more light on the spread of the disease when general rifle season starts later this month.

State game managers say another white-tailed deer is likely positive for Chronic Wasting Disease in Libby. If confirmed, this would be the tenth deer to test positive since the spring.

It’s been two years since Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) was detected in Montana’s deer herds, and in May the disease popped up in the northwest corner of the state in Libby. Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks (FWP) has a plan to manage the fatal disease based on its prevalence, a strategy born from more than 20 years of trial and error across the country.

Hundreds of white-tailed deer tags for a special chronic wasting disease (CWD) hunt near Libby sold out in about two hours Monday. The Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks says the hunt will help managers understand the prevalence of the disease and reduce its spread.