Yellowstone National Park

Mammoth Hot Springs in Yellowstone National Park releases steam into the bright blue sky, May 2019.
Rachel Cramer / Yellowstone Public Radio

Yellowstone National Park is famous for its explosive geysers, bubbling mud pots and psychedelic hot springs. Some visitors don’t realize it’s all part of a very large, active volcanic system. Others worry it’s going to erupt at any moment. Michael Poland, the Scientist-in-Charge of the Yellowstone Volcano Observatory, busts some myths and shares what’s really happening below the surface.

Tourists visit the general store at Tower Fall, Yellowstone National Park, June 2018.
YNP/Public Domain

The National Park Service wants to expand housing for seasonal employees who work for private companies operating in Yellowstone. Wednesday kicked off a 30-day public comment period.

Richard Parks' shows one of the fishing flies in Park's Fly Shop in Gardiner, MT, May 16, 2019.
Rachel Cramer / Yellowstone Public Radio

Tourism is the economic lifeblood for many gateway communities around Yellowstone National Park. In Gardiner, Montana, a second-generation fly shop is gearing up for its busiest season.

The National Park Service Hammerhead Crew catches a non-native lake trout in Yellowstone Lake, June 17, 2015.
Public Domain

Yellowstone National Park will temporarily ban wakeboard boats and plans to gate boat launches this season to reduce the risk of introducing new invasive species in park waters.

A wolf crosses a road near Artist Paint Pots, Yellowstone National Park, on November 07, 2017.
Public Domain

Federal wildlife managers are gearing up to remove gray wolves from the Endangered Species List. But some environmentalists say the species isn’t ready and that the government is basing its decision on outdated science. A group of biologists in four western national parks are looking at the impacts of wolf deaths on their packs and how this could affect the greater population.

Yellowstone National Park Superintendent Cameron (Cam) Sholly in his office at Mammoth Hot Springs, November 2018.
Public Domain

The new superintendent of Yellowstone National Park says shuttles could be the key to easing congestion, though he doesn't think recent growth in visitor numbers will continue. Cam Sholly, who came to Yellowstone last October, adds the park can’t solve its bison management problems without better cooperation between the state of Montana and American Indian tribes.

Yellowstone National Park/public domain

Following a record year of deaths for grizzly bears in the Greater Yellowstone, state and federal wildlife managers met in Bozeman this week to discuss efforts to reduce conflicts with humans. 

Wilson Hui / Flickr

A partial shutdown of the federal government has left national parks understaffed, including one of Montana’s biggest tourist-attractions: Yellowstone National Park.

The park is a massive revenue generator for the gateway communities, and at least one community is making sure that remains true.

The north entrance is open, and the tour companies, restaurants, and other businesses in Gardiner are running as usual.

The return of wolves and cougars to Yellowstone National Park is helping stream systems make a comeback. The new study published in the journal Ecohydrology suggests returning carnivores to a landscape can have a cascading effect across the ecosystem.

In September, Ear Spring Geyser in Yellowstone National Park erupted. At 20 feet, it was the largest eruption in over 60 years. But it wasn't just water that spewed out.

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