Water

A new study reveals how much water the U.S. uses in energy production. The answer is a lot – 58 trillion gallons. The data breakdown may be critical information for the Mountain West, where energy industries are big, but water can be scarce.

Between growing populations and changing climate conditions, our water sources are only expected to get more crunched. Communities in some very dry states have had to get creative about where to get their water, sometimes purifying sewage into drinking water. More western cities are beginning to get on board, too. But there’s a problem: the ick factor.

In parched states like Colorado, Utah, Wyoming, Montana and Idaho, water is a big issue, especially with growing populations that constantly need more and more. But there’s a big question: How do we accurately forecast the amount of water that will be available any given year? It’s not easy. But some Colorado scientists think they’re onto a possible solution -- inspired by Pokemon.

Field Days: Unexpected Results

Nov 27, 2017
Weston Merrill

On this episode of Field Days, rancher Weston Merrill discovers tough choices he made this summer while coping with the worst drought in thirty years ended up giving him his best breeding season yet.


The Trump Administration is moving to roll back an Obama-era policy that was designed to protect over half the nation’s streams from pollution.

The Environmental Protection Agency and Army Corps of Engineers Tuesday, outlined the process to unravel the 2015 rule defining which small waterways are covered under the Clean Water Act.

On Friday, Montana's Fish and Wildlife Commission is expected to vote on the so-called “quiet waters” initiative proposed last year.

Mountain Time Arts

Water will be the focus of a series of large-scale art events this summer by Mountain Time Arts, the Gallatin County based public arts organization which will use a recently awarded national arts grant to fund a summer long celebration and discussion on water.

Jackie Yamanaka

An art exhibition, readings, a jazz improvisation performance are just a few of the launching points meant to inspire contemplation and a community conversation about water.

Artist Sherri Cornett is the force behind the project titled “Flow.”

During her hikes around the region, she became inspired by water.

“Where I’ve taken time to sit down by the water and really take in the calming effects, thinking about, meditating about water,” she says.