Conservation

Sean Claffey, coordinator for the Southwest Montana Sagebrush Partnership, walks past curl-leaf mountain mahogany in the sagebrush steppe on land managed by the DNRC near Dillon, Montana, May 12, 2020.
Rachel Cramer/Yellowstone Public Radio

 

Sagebrush grasslands in southwest Montana have been disappearing for decades, putting ranchers and wildlife in jeopardy. A project is aiming to reverse this trend and engage a local workforce left in limbo by the novel coronavirus.

The Bitterroot National Forest banned the creation of new, bolted rock climbing routes earlier this month, forcing climbers and conservationists to contemplate the future of the sport in the area.

In so-called “sport climbing,” climbers clip ropes into small bolts fixed in the rock to keep from falling too far should they slip off as they ascend.

Montana Outdoor Heritage Project

Responses to a survey released Thursday show strong support for increasing taxes in Montana to fund conservation projects. At the same time, respondents said they want out-of-staters to pay more.

As Gallatin County's population grows, more development is moving into land historically used for agriculture. The sign advertises land for sale near Churchill, August 6, 2019.
Rachel Cramer / Yellowstone Public Radio

As Bozeman and its bedroom communities continue to grow, developers have started moving into prime farmland in Gallatin Valley. Farmers and ranchers there are struggling to uphold their way of life, and the valley's scenic views and wildlife corridors could disappear. Renewed funding for conservation easements aims to support the stewards of open land.


Montana’s working lands, wildlife, state parks and trails face tens of millions of dollars in unmet funding needs, according to a new report commissioned by a Montana coalition that’s advocating for more public funding for recreational public lands.

Caroline Byrd

A Canadian mining company and a pair of conservation groups have finalized agreements they say will protect two tributaries of the Yellowstone River and part of a crucial migration corridor for thousands of elk from Yellowstone National Park.

Courtesy of Jason Baldes

For the first time in 130 years, the Eastern Shoshone Tribe welcomed a newborn baby bison on the Wind River Indian Reservation in Wyoming.

The cute calf with high spiritual importance to the Eastern Shoshone was nearly eradicated by white settlers in the 19th century—so this spring birth marks a new approach and celebration of restorative justice.