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Tribal Affairs
Roughly six months ago, the federal government officially recognized the Little Shell Tribe of Chippewa Indians as a sovereign nation. It was national news then. But what does it mean now for the members and descendants of Little Shell?Nine students from the University of Montana School of Journalism spent a semester reporting on the impact of recognition on what has long been considered Montana’s “landless tribe.” The resulting student-produced series, "Project Little Shell," comprises the Native News Honors Project. It’s funded in part by the Greater Montana Foundation.

Little Shell Portraits: Iko’tsimiskimaki 'Ekoo' Beck

Iko’tsimiskimaki “Ekoo” Beck
Victor Yvellez/Yellowstone Public Radio
Iko’tsimiskimaki “Ekoo” Beck";s:3:

After the Little Shell Tribe of Chippewa Indians gained federal recognition six months ago, students from the University of Montana School of Journalism talked at length with tribal members about what that means to them.

In this story, reporter Victor Yvellez spoke with Iko’tsimiskimaki “Ekoo” Beck, who is in the process of disenrolling Blackfeet to join the recently recognized Little Shell Tribe of Chippewa Indians. 

Beck often travels from her home in Missoula to visit her family in and near Browning, Montana, on the Blackfeet Reservation. Here, she talks about that drive and the thoughts she has about tribal identity.

This story is funded in part by the Greater Montana Foundation.