Sarah Aronson

Sarah Aronson will take over in July as the producer for "The Write Question" on Montana Public Radio.

You all know Brian Kahn as the voice of public radio’s Home Ground, the award-winning interview program. It’s an awesome show, and one of its stated goals is to “emphasize shared values – the often-overlooked ‘common ground’ of diverse community interests.” In Rediscovering America: A 21st-Century Journey, we join Brian on a marathon trip across America in search of what sometimes separates--and ultimately connects -- us all. 

Sophia Shalmiyev wields her intellect and insight during a conversation about her lyrical, heart-breaking memoir, “Mother Winter.” Both the book and the conversation are a collection of Shalmiyev’s influences, from traumatic moments of her early years in Leningrad to the inspiring Riot Grrrl feminist movement. Shalmiyev speaks with authority and passion about mother loss, inviting listeners into a kaleidoscopic take on the immigrant narrative while offering possibilities for a more just future.

"In this case, you have to realize nature is a tough, tough mother. When you really work in biology you have to leave your human sympathies behind and that’s the most difficult part. The loss of a young peregrine falcon in the big picture is nothing, nothing. But it breaks your heart. And so you just have to steel yourself or those kind of moments, and that book is full of those kind of moments." -- Dan O'Brien

Kathryn Trueblood is the author of four books, including The Sperm Donor’s Daughter and Other Tales of Modern Family, and Diary of a Slut. Her work speaks candidly to the perils and absurdity of parenting in modern times. This interview traverses those dark and light places, while diving into craft elements along with Kathryn’s vision for a more supported future for women and families.

'A Million Acres'

Nov 12, 2019

Montana's stunning landscape shapes all who live here and all who visit.

In twenty powerful pieces of writing—essays, memoirs, short stories—the state's finest contemporary writers explore the plains, rivers, and mountains of Big Sky Country. They show us how natural beauty and hardship are two sides of the same coin, and how sometimes the only way to cure heartache is to visit the great outdoors.

Through her gorgeous work of lyric autobiography, Raki Kopernik invites us into the lives of her Israeli parents and grandparents. She also weaves her own memories into the unfolding story of family and home, offering a critical perspective on history and ancestral trauma. This is a conversation about borders, scarcity, abundance, queer and immigrant identities, hunger, and falafel. 

Home Everywhere is a suitcase full of souvenirs scavenged from lives liberated, briefly, from the cares of the world. A random collection of tourists embarks on a ten-day budget trip to parts unknown. The parts are destined to stay that way, while the tourists fixate on the actions and trappings of being alive. In the tradition of pilgrims across the ages, they seek spiritual salvation, physical healing, alluring accessories, and good bargains. Soon their sacred places emerge as elusive versions of home. Private sorrows persist. The daily itinerary holds hints of escape, but in the end, gravity prevails, and they head back to normal life, hopes unrealized and undiminished, their secret dreams following in the jet stream.

Alan Pelaez Lopez crossed the Mexico-US border at age 5 as an undocumented migrant. In this interview, they discuss various elements of their journey, from childhood to adulthood, as well as how they use art as activism. Alan Pelaez Lopez’s poetry offers an unflinching look at how humans treat one another, from the afro-indigenous slave trade to modern US legal practices that threaten a sense of history, identity, and deep humanity. In the face of all of this, Alan Pelaez Lopez retains a voice of resistance, love, hope, and even joy. This is an interview full of necessary truths, told from the heart.

These diverse stories of resistance, resilience, and love make it perfectly clear that there is no one single narrative of Montana women. Proceeds benefit Humanities Montana and the Zootown Arts Community Center. 

"Popular Music is both a love letter to music—how it accents, affects, and defines us through varying stages of our lives—and a hilarious and heart-breaking investigation of our relationship to technology, nature, and country. This book is in a class of its own and is simply unforgettable." -- Chicago Review of Books

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