Sarah McCammon

Sarah McCammon is a National Correspondent covering the Mid-Atlantic and Southeast for NPR. Her work focuses on political, social and cultural divides in America, including abortion and reproductive rights, and the intersections of politics and religion. She's also a frequent guest host for NPR news magazines, podcasts and special coverage.

During the 2016 election cycle, she was NPR's lead political reporter assigned to the Donald Trump campaign. In that capacity, she was a regular on the NPR Politics Podcast and reported on the GOP primary, the rise of the Trump movement, divisions within the Republican Party over the future of the GOP and the role of religion in those debates.

Prior to joining NPR in 2015, McCammon reported for NPR Member stations in Georgia, Iowa and Nebraska, where she often hosted news magazines and talk shows. She's covered debates over oil pipelines in the Southeast and Midwest, agriculture in Nebraska, the rollout of the Affordable Care Act in Iowa and coastal environmental issues in Georgia.

McCammon began her journalism career as a newspaper reporter. She traces her interest in news back to childhood, when she would watch Sunday-morning political shows – recorded on the VCR during church – with her father on Sunday afternoons. In 1998, she spent a semester serving as a U.S. Senate Page.

She's been honored with numerous regional and national journalism awards, including the Atlanta Press Club's "Excellence in Broadcast Radio Reporting" award in 2015. She was part of a team of NPR journalists that received a first-place National Press Club award in 2019 for their coverage of the Pittsburgh synagogue attack.

McCammon is a native of Kansas City, Mo. She spent a semester studying at Oxford University in the U.K. while completing her undergraduate degree at Trinity College near Chicago.

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Parents and children alike are adjusting to a life of school and work at home, and they're having to do it together. NPR's Yuki Noguchi is one of many parents trying to navigate.

YUKI NOGUCHI, BYLINE: Last week, I had just transitioned to working from home full-time. Then my 10-year-old son Kenzo came home with a large Ziploc bag full of school supplies.

Is this an iPad?

KENZO NOGUCHI: Yeah.

NOGUCHI: Oh, OK.

KENZO: This is, like, all of fourth grade in one Google Classroom.

As a writer, Lily Burana already spends a lot of time working alone at home, about an hour outside New York City. And as an extrovert, Burana says she relies on her social network to balance out the lonely hours.

"It's really hard, because at the end of the day, I look forward to shutting my laptop and taking my daughter to a playground, or going shopping, or meeting a friend at a museum, or having a coffee," Burana said. "And all of those things have to be tabled for now, out of a sense of obligation to not turn myself into an accidental vector."

Missouri could soon become the first state in the nation without a clinic providing abortions, but Planned Parenthood officials say the last remaining one there has already all but ceased performing the procedure.

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The remains of 2,411 fetuses found in Illinois last year after the death of a former abortion provider have been buried, but authorities say they're no closer to knowing why the doctor had been keeping them.

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Netflix has just released the final episodes of its adult animation series, BoJack Horseman. The show premiered in 2014 and follows the life of the titular BoJack — a horse who also happens to be a washed up '90s sitcom star living in the Hollywood Hills.

It's a show about Hollywood; it often mocks celebrity culture and the movie business — but it also tackles serious issues like addiction, mental illness, sexism and trauma. And a number of critics have said it's one of the best TV shows of the 2010s.

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President Trump spoke today in person at the March for Life rally in Washington, D.C., an annual gathering of abortion rights opponents. Trump is the first sitting president to do so.

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